Biden Joins the All-Stars of Constitutional Contempt

 

"What the New York Times calls a 'novel use of a law on workplace safety' is an invented power that violates the letter and spirit of Article II’s limits ...But as has been the case for much of Washington's decade-long journey into constitutional contempt, this one will end up as pure partisan applesauce." - The Dispatch

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Larry's picture

Moderator

Don't blame your hesitancy to get vaccinated on vaccine safety, religious / moral objections, Andrew Cuomo, Biden's Constitutional contempt, or deep state conspiracies. The blame clearly rests on your obstinate pride.

How did you decide this? 

I confess, as I have, that I don't understand why people think they have the right to determine other people's religious convictions. That has become increasingly common in that several years. We have been told religious objections in the voting booth weren't really Christian. We were told that religious objections to COVID church mandates weren't really biblical. We have now been told that religious objections to putting things into your body really aren't religious. 

It seems to me that this is another example of people not understanding what a religious exemption is. It belongs to the person holding it and the very nature of it means no one else gets to dictate it. The whole point is that you don't get to decide someone else's religious convictions for them. Nor do you get to impose yours on them. And they only get overridden in the most extreme of cases. This is not American political philosophy. This is biblical anthropology. 

As for constitutional concerns, it is still interesting how many people are willing to just throw away centuries of an idea to accomplish a short-sighted goal. We saw it with Trump (both supporters and detractors). We saw it with ecclesiology. We see it now with vaccines. There are many who say that these extreme situations are a good basis to do away with freedoms. IMO, they are wrong. In US history (and around the world) there are those who would rather die than give up ideals. 

Lastly, I wonder how it is not selfish to demand that other people give up their ideals and convictions to conform to yours for the sake of safety or whatever? It seems to me that demanding everyone else do something so you feel better about it has to fit somewhere in the spectrum of selfishness.

T Howard's picture

Larry wrote:

Don't blame your hesitancy to get vaccinated on vaccine safety, religious / moral objections, Andrew Cuomo, Biden's Constitutional contempt, or deep state conspiracies. The blame clearly rests on your obstinate pride.

How did you decide this?

Because these are all smoke screens. They are red herrings. People want to cling to these excuses to justify their decision. If you don't want to get the vaccine just say it and accept the consequences.

Larry wrote:
I confess, as I have, that I don't understand why people think they have the right to determine other people's religious convictions. That has become increasingly common in that several years. We have been told religious objections in the voting booth weren't really Christian. We were told that religious objections to COVID church mandates weren't really biblical. We have now been told that religious objections to putting things into your body really aren't religious. 

It seems to me that this is another example of people not understanding what a religious exemption is. It belongs to the person holding it and the very nature of it means no one else gets to dictate it. The whole point is that you don't get to decide someone else's religious convictions for them. Nor do you get to impose yours on them. And they only get overridden in the most extreme of cases. This is not American political philosophy. This is biblical anthropology.

If you claim your decision is based on your Christian faith as informed by Scripture, then you should be able to Scripturally defend your decision. When the first thing you do is pull the "God told me" card and twist Scripture in your defense, other Christians certainly have the right (and obligation) to call your bluff. Does not Scripture itself teach us to do this? So, the idea that we can't object or question if a "Christian" pulls the "God told me" card is patently absurd. 

Larry wrote:
As for constitutional concerns, it is still interesting how many people are willing to just throw away centuries of an idea to accomplish a short-sighted goal. We saw it with Trump (both supporters and detractors). We saw it with ecclesiology. We see it now with vaccines. There are many who say that these extreme situations are a good basis to do away with freedoms. IMO, they are wrong. In US history (and around the world) there are those who would rather die than give up ideals. 

Lastly, I wonder how it is not selfish to demand that other people give up their ideals and convictions to conform to yours for the sake of safety or whatever? It seems to me that demanding everyone else do something so you feel better about it has to fit somewhere in the spectrum of selfishness.

I'm not a fan of government mandates. I personally think they are an overreach. And, as I've said numerous times now, if you don't want to get vaccinated then don't. HOWEVER, don't claim your decision is based on Scripture, God, Andrew Cuomo, unvaccinated Mexican immigrants, microchip implants, vaccine safety issues, one-world government, etc. etc. Those are just excuses used by cowards and morons.

Larry's picture

Moderator

Because these are all smoke screens. They are red herrings.

The question stands: How did you determine this? (Your answer was just a repetition of the assertion.)

I don't want to continue this, and particularly not in multiple threads (though I posted in multiple because I had written the posts over days and finally posted them). I agree that if you are going to claim "God told me," you should be able to show where in Scripture God told you that. And you should not have a problem if someone disputes it. But that is a different matter than claiming the religious exemption as a matter of legality. And we should not confuse those. Even people who are wrong should get a religious exemption.

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