Political Philosophy

A Review of: Politics After Christendom: Political Theology in a Fractured World

"Almost the entirety of the book hinges on whether the reader accepts VanDrunen’s ...thesis: the 'Noahic covenant' of Genesis 8:21–9:17 is the foundational principle of any Christian political theology." - Ehrett

356 reads

Conservative Theologically, but Liberal Politically?

"In Europe, 'liberal'...means free market economics and liberty in general. Which is why the 'Liberal Party' in Australia is actually what Americans would describe as the conservative party. Whereas in the United States, 'liberal' has come to mean progressivism, openness to change of every sort, and left-leaning ideologies.  Including, ironically, support for strong central governments and opposition to free market capitalism." - Veith

301 reads

Should Protestants Reject Natural Law? Responding to Common Objections

"Even according to Protestant traditions with the gravest views of sin, fallen human beings do not get everything wrong when thinking about morality. Since Scripture itself affirms that the created order reveals God’s moral law, Christians should not turn their backs on natural law for the sake of promoting biblical teaching." - Public Discourse

233 reads

The State of Social Conservatism and the Role of “Public Discourse”

"Join a political movement if you like, but don’t confuse it with an intellectual movement. To the extent that you wish to pursue intellectual authenticity in public, you will need to give up on direct political influence." - Daniel Burns

282 reads

“Civic virtue is not a pleasant abstraction.... It is a necessity if we are to have an open and transparent government based on trust and cooperation.”

"When trust fails, the virtuous circle turns vicious, and then the state has to find other ways to encourage or compel cooperation in order to function.... it is not surprising that the two poles of American politics have drifted toward socialism and nationalism at a time when the effectiveness and trustworthiness of our public institutions is in decline." - The Venezuelafication of American Politics

256 reads

The Principle of the Sovereignty of the People in America

From Democracy in America (De La Démocratie en Amérique) vol. I, by Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835.

Chapter 4: The Principle of the Sovereignty of the People in America

It predominates over the whole of society in America — Application made of this principle by the Americans even before their Revolution — Development given to it by that Revolution — Gradual and irresistible extension of the elective qualification.

Whenever the political laws of the United States are to be discussed, it is with the doctrine of the sovereignty of the people that we must begin. The principle of the sovereignty of the people, which is to be found, more or less, at the bottom of almost all human institutions, generally remains concealed from view. It is obeyed without being recognized, or if for a moment it be brought to light, it is hastily cast back into the gloom of the sanctuary. “The will of the nation” is one of those expressions which have been most profusely abused by the wily and the despotic of every age. To the eyes of some it has been represented by the venal suffrages of a few of the satellites of power; to others by the votes of a timid or an interested minority; and some have even discovered it in the silence of a people, on the supposition that the fact of submission established the right of command.

2536 reads

“Mohler argues that the civil law, which has been dechristianized by secularization, needs to be rechristianized”

"He ought to know that he is playing with fire. When he demands we rechristianize the civil laws, he owes us an account of why our Christian ancestors were wrong for almost a thousand years as they built Western civilization on a natural law tradition that culminated, and logically must culminate, in political liberalism." - Law & Liberty

1349 reads

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