Political Philosophy

The Protestant Reformers and the Natural Law Tradition

"Although it is decidedly true that they championed a particular understanding of grace and faith that took issue with their Roman Catholic counterparts, . . . they assumed the natural law as a part of the fabric of the created order and therein maintained continuity with those across the Reformation divide." - Public Discourse

262 reads

“the early church was not socialist.”

"There are still arrangements like this. They’re called monasteries. Before exploring how monasteries show us how 'socialism' can work, let me acknowledge that I’m hesitant to present monasticism as 'socialism.' The voluntary profession of monasticism has nothing to do with the state seizing the means of production or the mass terror that inevitably follows in its wake." - Acton

296 reads

Who’s Afraid of Integralists?

"for a small but growing cadre of intellectual Roman Catholics the political philosophy of 'integralism,' with church and state integrated, not separate, is increasingly common. There’s disagreement over practical specifics, but what unites integralists is their conviction that the liberal democratic order is now, and perhaps always was, morally bankrupt." - James Diddams

334 reads

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