Political Philosophy

“The liberal tradition has some serious philosophical weaknesses, especially in anthropology. It has also contributed to the development of political and religious liberty.”

“We can be tempted to use terms to make a splash or win an argument at the expense of complexity. You see this today with everyone condemning or praising liberalism. The term has become so vague that it increasingly means 'stuff I don’t like' to some and 'progress and freedom' to others.” - Acton

721 reads

Remembering the real revolution of July 4

"These inspirational and linguistically beautiful words of the Declaration of Independence justified the American colonies’ break from England. But they did more than that. They explained to the world and to history that natural rights formed the basis of civil law and government. This was the truly revolutionary aspect of that document signed on July 4, 1776." - Acton

449 reads

“The Bible tells of a greater source of truth than human reasoning. The Left can’t handle that.”

"The Bible and the Left (not liberalism, leftism) are as opposed as any two worldviews can be. While there are people who claim to hold both a Bible-based worldview and left-wing views, these people are few in number. Moreover, what they do is take left-wing positions and wrap them in a few Bible verses." - National Review

580 reads

Liberalism: The Great Anti-Tradition

"The liberal person is an autonomous self whose ultimate goal is liberation from every idea and restraint except for the idea that restraint is unacceptable. Mitchell writes that the first stage of liberalism still relied on the Christian, traditional society in which it lived. But the second stage of liberalism, which he defines as beginning in the late 18th century, threw off even these restraints." - TAC

562 reads

6 Quotes: C.S. Lewis on government, economics, and freedom

“Is there any possibility of getting the super Welfare State’s honey and avoiding the sting? Let us make no mistake about the sting. The Swedish sadness is only a foretaste. To live his life in his own way, to call his house his castle, to enjoy the fruits of his own labour, to educate his children as his conscience directs, to save for their prosperity after his death—these are wishes deeply ingrained in civilised man. Their realization is almost as necessary to our virtues as to our happiness.

771 reads

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