Books

Gene Veith reviews “Dominion: How the Christian Revolution Remade the World”

Athiest historian Tom Holland "shows just how different Christian values and ethics were from those of the Greeks and the Romans and how the Christian mindset has prevailed in Western Civilization even among his fellow secularists." - Veith

224 reads

Review: If I Had Lunch with C. S. Lewis

A review of If I Had Lunch with C. S. Lewis: Explaining the Ideas of C. S. Lewis on the Meaning of Life,* by Alister McGrath, Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House, 2014, 241 pages, hdbk.

C. S. Lewis is an endlessly fascinating person. He was an Oxford Don with few equals as an intellectual. Anyone who is familiar with the three volumes of Letters is well aware that they are reading the correspondence of a man who had read (and often reread) just about every great work of literature in the Western canon. Lewis was a Medievalist, thoroughly at home in Thomas Aquinas, Dante and Boccaccio (in their originals), with Beowulf and the Nordic mythology, and with Edmund Spenser, Milton, and a whole roster of other poets and mystics and playwrights.

But Lewis not only knew the greats of the 10th to the 16th centuries, he was also immersed in Plato and Aristotle, the Tragedies, Virgil and Ovid, and Neo-Platonists, again, all in the original Greek and Latin. His Letters especially brim with references and allusions to these works as well as a host of British, French and German classics. He was, by any measure, a brilliant scholar.

But to say this about Lewis is not to get at the whole man. For C. S. Lewis was a man of down-to-earth uncommon sense. His faculties were aware of the limitations of the five senses and the realities of life and truth that dwelt beyond. He, like G. K. Chesterton, saw the miraculous everywhere.

1805 reads

Is It Too Late to Recover the Founders’ Presidency?

Prakash's book "offers a serious plan for the restoration of something closer to the original intent of the presidency and its relationship to our other political institutions. He offers a 13-part plan that includes making presidential advisors subject to Senate approval, growing Congress’s own expert staff, shrinking the offices in the executive branch ...

376 reads

“Discovering Hope is an evangelistic resource designed to carefully unpack the truths of the gospel to a person with little or no Christian background.”

"This gospel study handbook blends Bible discovery study methods with lucid explanations so that readers can see and understand Biblical truth for themselves. Through a series of eight lessons, readers will learn the essential gospel truths about God the Creator, man the sinner, Jesus the Savior, and the need for repentance and faith." - Micah Colbert

282 reads

“Mohler argues that the civil law, which has been dechristianized by secularization, needs to be rechristianized”

"He ought to know that he is playing with fire. When he demands we rechristianize the civil laws, he owes us an account of why our Christian ancestors were wrong for almost a thousand years as they built Western civilization on a natural law tradition that culminated, and logically must culminate, in political liberalism." - Law & Liberty

1187 reads

Review: Bavinck’s Theological Epistemology

"Sutanto’s highly organized work is presented in seven chapters with one to four sections each. Chapter 1, Re-reading Bavinck’s theological epistemology opens with a call to re-frame the scholarly literature according to Bavinck’s organic motif. This motif is more than an 'organizing devise,' says Sutanto" - Joel Heflin

299 reads

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