Answering a Few More Objections to Authorized: Part 1, The Modern Versions Are Copyrighted; They’re in It for the Money

"...in a debate like this one, the objections never really end. And I think there are a few more that merit attention." - Mark Ward

1156 reads

There are 12 Comments

Bert Perry's picture

It's worth noting that legally speaking, there are at least two reasons to copyright a work.  First is to collect royalties, but second is to prevent someone from changing your work and presenting it as your own.  I've seen a fair number of works where the copyright is retained, but specific permission is given to copy it unaltered for local church use.

Regarding the issue of profit and royalties, that objection bothers me, as (as an engineer) I work in areas where I get paid not because of widgets I make, but because of ideas I create.  If I argue against copyrights, I'm basically saying I shouldn't get paid.  The same applies to experts in ancient languages and culture who help us to understand the Scriptures.  Idea rats need to eat, too!

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

GregH's picture

The irony is that Erasmus was quite obsessed with money. In fact, a credible knock on Erasmus is that he often rushed works to print without enough editing because he needed money. Historians have access to numerous letters written by him that give insight into his thinking.

Also, though of course this is no condemnation but interesting nonetheless, according to what I have read, Erasmus was apparently the very first writer ever who was able to actually earn a living through publishing. 

M. Osborne's picture

Copyright allows you to prohibit alterations. It also allows you to prohibit derivative works you wouldn't want. If someone wants to produce the Queer Study Bible in the ESV, the copyright holder can say, "Um, no."

Michael Osborne
Philadelphia, PA

Steve Newman's picture

When people say "they are in it for the money" I think they mean the copyrighters and the publishers rather than the translators in general. 

 

Bert Perry's picture

Steve Newman wrote:

When people say "they are in it for the money" I think they mean the copyrighters and the publishers rather than the translators in general. 

 

They might, but the book/work exists because of the publishers and copyright owners.  They are the ones that got the author (s) connected with the project, and they're the ones who lose out if someone steals the pdf and spreads it around the world without attribution or payment.  Very often, they give the author an advance so he has the chance to write it.  No?  I would argue that demonizing the publishers/copyright holders is exactly the same, practically speaking, as demonizing the authors/composers/etc..

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

Bert Perry's picture

....can't help but note that NewsCorp's HQ hasn't existed for nearly 18 years....maybe that explains their negative EPS?  :^)

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

Jim's picture

Bert Perry wrote:

....can't help but note that NewsCorp's HQ hasn't existed for nearly 18 years....maybe that explains their negative EPS?  :^)

Info on their HQ:

News Corporation

1211 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10036
United States
212-416-3400
http://newscorp.com

-----------------

As for me:

TylerR's picture

Editor

If people would only heed Psalm 12 and stick with the KJV ...

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and an Investigations Manager with a Washington State agency. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

M. Osborne's picture

Larry Nelson wrote:

.....except in Gail Riplinger's or Jack Chick's dreams:

Person #1: "Hey, let's publish and sell Bibles. Then we will be rich!"

Person #2: "Sounds great!  I've always wanted a Bentley and a yacht!"

I worked for BJU Press during grad school, and a thought like this was in the back of my mind. Unless your name is Tim LaHaye or Beverly Lewis, there's not a whole lot of money in Christian publishing.

Michael Osborne
Philadelphia, PA

T Howard's picture

M. Osborne wrote:
I worked for BJU Press during grad school, and a thought like this was in the back of my mind. Unless your name is Tim LaHaye or Beverly Lewis, there's not a whole lot of money in Christian publishing.

Unless you're Dave Ramsey, Johnny Mac, or Beth Moore.