5 things churches could learn from restaurants

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Rob Fall's picture

In San Francisco, if a restaurant can't toe the line, it's out of business in a year or less.  There's just to much competition at the various price points.

Bull's was known for its fine Texas cuisine and great service.  One reviewer commented, "The service is so good.  The waitress could pour Valvoline into your coffee cup and you'd drink it with a smile."

 

Hoping to shed more light than heat..

G. N. Barkman's picture

The author made some good points, but it's a troubling situation.  Do we cater to the consumer mentality of the general public in order to grow our churches, or do we try to bring our people to a better understanding of what "church" is all about?

Some might say we should do both.  I'm sure we all do to some degree.  But doesn't catering to the consumer mentality war against a solid Biblical understanding?  If you say the important elements are God's Word, prayer, loving and ministering to one another, and evangelizing our friends and neighbors, but keep "tweaking" methods and programs because such things are necessary to "succeed," aren't we betraying by our actions, that we don't really believe God's ways will accomplish His purposes?

Just wondering.

G. N. Barkman

Susan R's picture

EditorModerator

The article makes an interesting point, but not one that is IMO substantial or truly productive. The church functions on levels and for purposes that are simply not comparable to anything else on this earth. Human measures of success aren't applicable or appropriate, and nothing more or less than the Holy Spirit effects change in someone's life. 

Rob Fall's picture

I think he answered no in point 5.

G. N. Barkman wrote:

The author made some good points, but it's a troubling situation.  Do we cater to the consumer mentality of the general public in order to grow our churches, or do we try to bring our people to a better understanding of what "church" is all about?

Some might say we should do both.  I'm sure we all do to some degree.  But doesn't catering to the consumer mentality war against a solid Biblical understanding?  If you say the important elements are God's Word, prayer, loving and ministering to one another, and evangelizing our friends and neighbors, but keep "tweaking" methods and programs because such things are necessary to "succeed," aren't we betraying by our actions, that we don't really believe God's ways will accomplish His purposes?

Just wondering.

Hoping to shed more light than heat..