The Answers Christianity Has That Science Doesn’t

"Humans have a unique capacity for wondering about meaning, purpose, and value. ... In Born to Wonder: Exploring Our Deepest Questions—Why Are We Here and Why Does It Matter?, Alister McGrath sets out to explore the significance of this remarkable human trait." - TGC

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Aaron Blumer's picture

EditorAdmin

This is an affiliate link. Sadly, the book is not available in audio.

Views expressed are always my own and not my employer's, my church's, my family's, my neighbors', or my pets'. The house plants have authorized me to speak for them, however, and they always agree with me.

Mark_Smith's picture

I've tried to read J P Moreland and William Lane Craig. Just don't care that much about the questions they ask and try to answer. If you do, go ahead.

I once ordered a used book from Amazon of Moreland's on the philosophy of science. It was so marked up literally every word, sentence, paragraph, and page was covered with copious notes written in thick black ink. I was like, if someone wrote this much analysis of this guy's book, why did they sell it? Anyway, it was impossible to actually read the book because of these notes. But I tried. I couldn't get past the first chapter. I scanned the book and nothing grabbed my interest at all.

Aaron Blumer's picture

EditorAdmin

I have yet to finish a book by Moreland. I have a couple I whittle away at now and then. I'm not sure what it is, but I've found Craig far more interesting. But Schaeffer and Plantinga and Behe far more interesting than Craig. Also Pearcey.

It definitely has a lot to do with your interests and where you are in your spiritual and intellectual journey. For me, the last few years have been a kind of return to roots for me intellectually, along with/because of an awareness of gaps in my worldview and no longer being content to leave those areas unsettled.

Then coronavirus happened and I've been ....distracted? But there are pieces of that whole dynamic (especially conservative evangelical subculture) that tug me back to those gaps.

I haven't read any McGrath yet, but I'm looking forward to it.

Views expressed are always my own and not my employer's, my church's, my family's, my neighbors', or my pets'. The house plants have authorized me to speak for them, however, and they always agree with me.

Mark_Smith's picture

Here's what I mean about Moreland and Craig. I have tons of questions as a scientist about the relationship between science and Christianity. Rarely do either of those guys address any of them. That's my issue with them.

josh p's picture

Mark, I suspect with your training that you would find Platinga far more helpful. He addresses that issue directly. 

Aaron Blumer's picture

EditorAdmin

Where the Conflict Really Lies is about that very question.

It's one of my worldview gaps I'm trying to work through.

I found Craig most interesting where he does talk about that... because he does, some in On Guard. He's mostly oriented toward rationally supporting Christianity, but this overlaps quite a bit with relationship between science and Christianity.

I suspect Nancy Pearcey gives the topic attention as well in The Soul of Science: Christian Faith and Natural Philosophy ... but I haven't read that one. I thought she had something newer on that topic, but I'm not finding it at the moment.

Views expressed are always my own and not my employer's, my church's, my family's, my neighbors', or my pets'. The house plants have authorized me to speak for them, however, and they always agree with me.