Non-Christians Should Not Be Part of Worship Music Bands, Says Worship Professor

"Church leaders affirm the profession of another person's faith when they allow that person to have a public, leading role during the church gathering. And that affirmation is easily misunderstood, especially by unbelievers." CPost

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Bert Perry's picture

When a church my wife and I used to attend had nonbelievers on the music team, an unsaved coworker of hers visited and noted that it was "church lite".  Yes, it makes a difference, and you don't have to be a firm third degree separationist to get this.

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

TylerR's picture

Editor

I don't think many people at SI use "worship bands." Most of us probably do something radical ... like congregational singing. The fact a Christian publication seriously has to ask whether someone has to be a believer in order to worship God through music reveals how divorced many Christian congregations are from reality, and from God.

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and an Investigations Manager with a Washington State agency. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

John E.'s picture

While I understand (and agree) with Matthew Westerholm's reasons for why he believes his article on Desiring God is necessary, it's shameful that this even has to be argued out loud.

If someone believe that it's okay to have a unregenerate heart lead God's people in the worship of God on God's day, then that person shouldn't be allowed to be in a position in which they are asked to make those kinds of decisions.  

Larry Nelson's picture

 

TylerR wrote:

I don't think many people at SI use "worship bands."

We do.  We offer both "traditional" and "contemporary" services.  Our overall attendance is typically about 20% traditional, and about 80% contemporary.

TylerR wrote:

Most of us probably do something radical ... like congregational singing.

False assumption (that attendees at contemporary services don't or won't sing).  Our attendees sing heartily and loudly, at both types of services.

TylerR wrote:

The fact a Christian publication seriously has to ask whether someone has to be a believer in order to worship God through music reveals how divorced many Christian congregations are from reality, and from God.

100% agree.  At both types of services, nobody sings on our platform or plays an instrument of any type without a credible testimony of salvation.  I can't imagine otherwise!

Greg Long's picture

TylerR wrote:
I don't think many people at SI use "worship bands."

We do. And once a month there is also choir and orchestra.

TylerR wrote:
Most of us probably do something radical ... like congregational singing.

We do that, too.

TylerR wrote:
The fact a Christian publication seriously has to ask whether someone has to be a believer in order to worship God through music reveals how divorced many Christian congregations are from reality, and from God.
The question is whether they can lead worship in the worship band, but other that that clarification I can't say I disagree with you.

-------
Greg Long, Ed.D. (SBTS)

Pastor of Adult Ministries
Grace Church, Des Moines, IA

Adjunct Instructor
School of Divinity
Liberty University

Ron Bean's picture

I've known churches that only use a piano and maybe an organ who regularly employ unsaved musicians to play the instruments. My unsaved brother-in-law has made a decent living doing that for more than 20 years.

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

Bert Perry's picture

My church has a small group that plays the newer tunes, including a doctor's wife who loves playing the drums.  I tease the youth pastor that he needs to trade his accoustic in on a Stratocaster a la Wayne Campbell.  Isaac Watts just screams for some power chords from time to time.  (no, I am not kidding....you could do "When I survey" as a heavy metal power ballad a la "Home Sweet Home")

The one quibble I have is that given that the root words for "worship" refer to prostrating one's self, I hesitate to call it a "worship band."  "Praise band", sure, "musicans", absolutely, but "worship" isn't the right word IMO.

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

Bert Perry's picture

I was hoping for some absolution because that's not the song that the pastor that wrote the book you were referring to was thinking of.   :^)  

And I actually used to make fun of the group by pronouncing their name with the umlauts as best I could.  The sound is comparable to your body's response when you have some bad potato salad at a picnic. #hazardsofGermanclass

 

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.