Small Church

Is the small, single full time clergy staff church a luxury churches can no longer afford?

"I see solid, educated, selfless, dedicated pastors around me who are full time clergy in churches of 40 to 60 in attendance. Is giving by a group this size enough to support a full time pastor adequately? Do members give per capita sufficient to cover a $50,000 or more salary cost by their minister? Depends, I suppose, on the church." - SBC Voices

1800 reads

“... small churches are not a problem to be fixed, a virtue to be praised or an excuse to do shoddy work.”

"...since these misconceptions about small churches keep persisting, let’s take a look at them, one at a time: 1. Small Churches Are Not a Problem: Just because a church is small does not mean that it is broken, lazy, visionless, ingrown, poorly led or theologically faulty." - Church Leaders

332 reads

“When healthy small churches grow, they become healthy big churches. When unhealthy small churches grow, they become unhealthy big churches.”

"Being small does not mean that something is broken. But if something is broken, you can’t fix it by making it bigger. Bigger fixes nothing." - Church Leaders

275 reads

The Comparison Trap

By Daryl Neipp

In his book Satisfied, Jeff Manion describes a fictional interaction to which we can all relate. It’s a warm evening. A dad calls to his son, who is playing in the backyard, “Would you like some ice cream?” The son bounds into the house, where he finds a large scoop of ice cream in his bowl, and life is good (especially if it is mint chocolate chip).

However, what if there are two boys? The dad calls them both in from playing. What if they find their ice cream but the scoop distribution is not exactly equitable? It wouldn’t be long until the dad heard, “That’s NOT fair!” from one of the boys.

We can conclude that the issue would have nothing to do with what one boy received; rather, it would have everything to do with what the other received. This is how comparisons work: we look at what someone else has, then become discontent with what we have. While this little story is something we can all smile about, the problem of comparison is not something we simply outgrow. Well into adulthood we carry this tendency to always search for the greener grass, which can be particularly harmful within ministry contexts.

1219 reads

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