Church Leadership

Women Preaching

Reposted from The Cripplegate.

Women are a great gift of God. I love the four I get to live with. My daughters are showing me up in skiing and soccer. My wife was a gymnast for years, and can do backflips on a four-inch wide balance beam four feet off the ground. I’m still working on somersaults. And she is smarter than me in every area of life. But that’s just a small sampling of the great ways God has skilled and gifted the ladies in my life. And the list would get long if I also mentioned the skills and giftedness of the women in the local church I get to serve.

God created women for his glory. In fact, his word has the highest view of women compared to any and every religion, ideology, spirituality, or philosophy out there. But, that does not mean that God has men and women share every task and role. That’s part of his glory; the ways in which men and women complement one another.

The issue of women preachers has again arisen to the forefront of evangelicalism. One position holds that Scripture forbids women from preaching to congregations where men are present in the local church. Another (egalitarianism, “soft complementarianism”) hold that Scripture does not forbid women to preach, or permits it under certain circumstances. This article will consider a few matters concerning the debate.

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How Do Churches End Up With Domineering Bullies for Pastors?

"There is obviously much to be learned from both successful CEOs and also great generals, but both models can quickly become toxic. When either becomes the primary model for Christian leadership, is it any wonder that domineering pastors result?" - Christian Leaders

1361 reads

10 Internal Signs of a Leadership Ego Problem

"Some people are openly arrogant. Even if they don’t always recognize it, others quickly see it in them....many of us struggle privately with ego. To help you determine if that’s the case for you, here are some signs honest, vulnerable pastors have shared with me over the years." - Church Leaders

570 reads

What Clergy Need to Know About Mandatory Reporting

"Currently, clergy are considered mandatory reporters in about half of all states. But even those laws vary because of the unique nature of pastoral care. Some states that include clergy as mandatory reporters exempt pastors from that requirement if abuse is disclosed or discovered during 'pastorally privileged conversations.'” - Church Leaders

2373 reads

Executive Leadership of Harvest Bible Chapel to Resign

"Admitting they had 'made mistakes,' members of the elder board spoke to Harvest Bible Chapel’s congregation and promised big changes are coming to the Chicago area megachurch. ....a whole lot of people are going to be resigning from positions of leadership—including all five members of the executive committee of the elder board." - Church Leaders

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From the Archives: What Christians Owe Their Pastors

By Roy E. Knuteson. From Baptist Bulletin (September/October 2008); used by permission. © Regular Baptist Press, all rights reserved.

Years ago a minister was called “the parson,” meaning “the person.” He was a VIP. He was honored as the preacher of the gospel, a molder of public opinion, and the conscience of the community. Not so today. A recently published survey revealed the most respected people in the average American community. Ministers ranked far down on the list, behind doctors, judges, psychologists, civic leaders, and police officers. Why?

No doubt the widespread sexual and financial scandals among members of the clergy have seriously affected the public opinion of them. Unfortunately, many pastors are mere puppets, moved by the whims of their parishioners. Some are controlled by a few strong laypeople, and others are “religious politicians” instead of prophets of God. Fortunate is the congregation whose pastor speaks “the very words of God” (NIV, 1 Peter 4:11) and diligently leads the church.

We believe that the Bible words “elder” and “bishop” refer to and include the pastor (or pastors) of a local church. Each of these titles reveals a facet of his divine calling. As an elder, he is to provide mature, responsible leadership. As the bishop, he is to be the general manager, providing careful oversight of the Lord’s work. And as the pastor, he is charged with caring for and feeding the flock of God (Acts 20:28).

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10 Crucial Commitments of Effective Deacons

By Jim Vogel. Republished with permission from Baptist Bulletin.

No church can be successful without committed leadership. It starts with pastors who are committed to the Word and the people they serve, but it includes deacons who take their role seriously and serve with genuine dedication.

As a pastor, I was privileged to serve alongside some committed, effective deacons. They contributed to the success of the churches I pastored, and I could not have accomplished my ministry without them. Consider this list of 10 commitments that are essential in effective “deaconing.”

A commitment to personal godliness

Deacons must first be personal examples of dedicated Christian living. Churches often suffer when they select deacons primarily on innate leadership ability or business acumen without a corresponding commitment to godliness.

A commitment to the church’s mission and vision

Deacons who are not behind the general ministry direction of the church hinder more than help.

A commitment to the leadership of the pastor(s)

Pastors do not expect their deacons to be blind, unthinking followers with whom there is never a disagreement. However, the Bible teaches that pastors give ultimate leadership in local churches. Men who cannot support their pastors should not serve as deacons.

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