Church Leadership

Leadership Development: A Three-Step Process

By Micah Colbert. Reposted from Rooted Thinking.

Leadership development is one of those things that churches frequently talk about but rarely plan for or actually do. According to Ephesians 4:12-16, every church is responsible to train its members for gospel-advancing, church-building ministry. But how do we do that? Below is an example of the process our church uses to develop leaders for ministry:

The Three Step Process of Ministry Leadership Development at Community of Grace

Our prayerful desire at Community of Grace Church is to cultivate a culture where ministry leaders are encouraged and equipped to use their gifts to serve the body of Christ. For this to happen, we recognize the need to be intentional about ministry leadership development. As elders, we have identified a three-step process that we will use to choose, train, and equip potential leaders for gospel advancing ministry:

Identify

The elders seek to identify servants who are teachable, able, faithful, and fruitful (STAFF) to lead and serve in the various ministries of Community of Grace Church. Below are questions we use to help identify STAFF people:

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“We keep bad leaders around because we want someone who can make us feel something.”

"The Cross... also reveals, in history’s most transcendent moment, that Jesus’ focus is not on trying to evoke feelings in others. Nor is it on stoically demonstrating timeless truth." - TGC

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Biblical Roles of Men & Women in the Church, Part 2

By Todd Kinde. Read Part 1.

Feminine Activity in the Community of the Redeemed

The New Testament delineates various activities done by certain women. Anna the prophetess gave thanks to God and spoke of Christ (Lk 2:38). Mary sat at Jesus’ feet receiving instruction (Lk 10:39). The Samaritan woman discussed theology with Jesus an 4:7ff.). Women including Mary the mother of Jesus were full members of the community of believers and devoting themselves to prayer (Acts 1:14). Tabitha organized a benevolent ministry to the needy (Acts 9:36). Lydia hosted a church plant (Acts 16:14, 40). The four daughters of Philip prophesied (Acts 28:9). Priscilla alongside her husband expounded the faith to Apollos (Acts 18:26), is called a coworker who risked her neck for Paul (Ro 16:4, 5), and hosted a church in her home (1Co 16:19). Phoebe is commended as a servant, a deaconess of the church (Ro 16:1). Mary, Tryphena, Tryphosa, and Persis worked hard in and for the church (Ro 16:6, 12). The mother of Rufus cared for Paul like a mother to him (Ro 16:13). Euodia and Syntyche labored side by side with Paul as fellow workers in the gospel ministry (Php 4:2, 3). Nympha hosted a church in her home (Col 4:15). Lois and Eunice discipled Timothy in the faith (2Ti 1:5; 3:14-15).

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Biblical Roles of Men & Women in the Church, Part 1

Todd Kinde

A biblical theology of manhood and womanhood within the church can be approached in a couple of ways. One way is to determine from Scripture what a man or a woman can or cannot do in the life and ministry of the local church. A second way is to discern what man and woman are to be within the local church. Who one is determines what one does, while what one does defines who one is. With this premise in mind, this article will begin by gleaning the Scripture for truths regarding our being, then truths regarding our doing.

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Complementarians Aren’t Inherently Patriarchal

"...the view makes two claims: First, that men and women are equal image bearers worthy of equal honor and value; second, that men and women hold different roles, with men exercising a 'headship' that corresponds to a particular kind of authority in the church and the home. But while the word complementarian has traceable roots...its beliefs work out differently across church traditions." - C.Today

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