Books

Loving Our Neighbors in a Fallen World

"What follows is not a review of The Third Option but rather a meditation on its central thesis, that our attitudes and behavior toward our fellow human beings must take full account of the fact that they were created in God’s image. This realization can help us respond in a Christlike way not only to issues of race but also to many of the other contentious and divisive issues that plague our society." - P&D

561 reads

White Fragility and the Bible’s Big Story

"In this follow-up article I want to turn to the Bible to suggest how it might help us understand issues of race and racism, for it also contains a narrative structure.... What I would like to do is compare and contrast the content of [DiAngelo’s White Fragility] story with the Bible’s." - Challies

566 reads

White Fragility and Getting White People to Talk About Racism

"I have had quite a number of people ask my opinion about this book [Robin DiAngelo: White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism] ... I am going to provide a kind of summary of its contents and then, in a second article, discuss whether it is a helpful resource for Christians. I primarily want to consider the 'story' DiAngelo is telling." - Challies

1520 reads

Seven Quotes to Encourage You in Your Work: From Wayne Grudem's “Business for the Glory of God: The Bible’s Teaching on the Moral Goodness of Business”

"Grudem... looks at all the activities of work and business through the lens of imitation, the idea that 'God enjoys seeing his character reflected in our lives.' In his book he explores all the opportunities business provides Christians to imitate God, thereby reflecting his character and honoring him." - TIFWE

929 reads

Gene Veith reviews “Dominion: How the Christian Revolution Remade the World”

Athiest historian Tom Holland "shows just how different Christian values and ethics were from those of the Greeks and the Romans and how the Christian mindset has prevailed in Western Civilization even among his fellow secularists." - Veith

465 reads

Review: If I Had Lunch with C. S. Lewis

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A review of If I Had Lunch with C. S. Lewis: Explaining the Ideas of C. S. Lewis on the Meaning of Life,* by Alister McGrath, Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House, 2014, 241 pages, hdbk.

C. S. Lewis is an endlessly fascinating person. He was an Oxford Don with few equals as an intellectual. Anyone who is familiar with the three volumes of Letters is well aware that they are reading the correspondence of a man who had read (and often reread) just about every great work of literature in the Western canon. Lewis was a Medievalist, thoroughly at home in Thomas Aquinas, Dante and Boccaccio (in their originals), with Beowulf and the Nordic mythology, and with Edmund Spenser, Milton, and a whole roster of other poets and mystics and playwrights.

But Lewis not only knew the greats of the 10th to the 16th centuries, he was also immersed in Plato and Aristotle, the Tragedies, Virgil and Ovid, and Neo-Platonists, again, all in the original Greek and Latin. His Letters especially brim with references and allusions to these works as well as a host of British, French and German classics. He was, by any measure, a brilliant scholar.

But to say this about Lewis is not to get at the whole man. For C. S. Lewis was a man of down-to-earth uncommon sense. His faculties were aware of the limitations of the five senses and the realities of life and truth that dwelt beyond. He, like G. K. Chesterton, saw the miraculous everywhere.

3929 reads

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