Books

Beyond Authority and Submission: A Review

"This selectivity in choosing examples could lead the reader to miss the overarching trends that we see in scripture with respect to male and female roles....When giving positive examples of men and women, which qualities are typically emphasized in the Bible? Miller's analysis seems to give a flattened-out answer to this question." - Ref21

431 reads

Focus on the Family's Tim Goeglein Talks About “American Restoration”

"Goeglein says his time in Washington hasn’t made him cynical. In fact, as you’ll hear, it’s made him hopeful. But it’s a hope underpinned by the hope of the Gospel, and a belief that Christians can and will engage the current culture and not flee from it. These are ideas he explains in his new book “American Restoration:  How Faith, Family, and Personal Sacrifice Can Heal Our Nation.” - BreakPoint

317 reads

David Bentley Hart’s Lonely, Last Stand for Christian Universalism

In his new book, That All Shall Be Saved: Heaven, Hell, and Universal Salvation, "Hart is no longer countering unbelief—as in Atheist Delusions (2010)—but is now in all-out war with fellow Christians believers who hold to traditional views on heaven and hell." - TGC

493 reads

Review of ‘Can We Trust the Gospels?’ by Peter J. Williams

This excellent little book by the English biblical scholar Peter J. Williams (not to be confused with the apologist Peter S. Williams) is a readable and informative introduction to some of the main questions people have about the four Gospels. In eight tightly argued but entertaining chapters Williams, who acts as principal of Tyndale House, Cambridge, dispels common myths and furnishes many enlightening facts about Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, avoiding dogmatic overreach but still making a very solid case for their trustworthiness.

Williams’ first chapter surveys external sources such as Tacitus, Pliny the Younger, and Josephus to corroborate many features in the Evangelists. Tacitus reported on the “vast multitude” of Christians in Rome in AD 64, the year of the great fire (23). Since there is a distance of over 2,000 miles between Rome and Jerusalem, this testifies to the extent to which the new Faith had spread throughout the Roman Empire in Apostolic times. Incidentally, such witnesses as Tacitus seem to give the lie to the more conservative estimates for the extent of Christianity in the first centuries (cf. also 27). These non-Christian sources also confirm the execution of Jesus in the time of Pontius Pilate.

A real reature of this chapter, which continues throughout the book, is the way Williams appeals to common sense and reasonable expectations to make his points. For instance, on page 34 the author observes,

1556 reads

How to Lead in a World of Distraction: An Interview with Clay Scroggins

"What are the three villains of leadership?.... To put them simply they’re the appearance of success, the allure of progress, and the attraction of certainty. Everyone experiences these things, whether they’re in a position of leadership or not, and they have the ability to really keep us from moving forward in our lives." - Bible Gateway

933 reads

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