Ecclastical Separation

I am looking for information on the various degrees of separation that are a constant source of discussion on here.  Can someone point me in the direction of some works that might explain what they are?  Since this is a frequent topic of discussion on these boards, I imagine some of you should have some references for me.

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Jay's picture

Hi Teri-

SI ran this article yesterday on Separation you might want to check out: http://sharperiron.org/article/forgetting-doctrine-of-separation

Dr. Bauder wrote a few good articles, and these two were cited in the above article: http://sharperiron.org/article/now-about-those-differences-part-twenty-one and http://sharperiron.org/article/now-about-those-differences-part-twenty-four.  This was from an address at AACCS a few years ago, and it's a must read.

Joel Tetreau wrote a couple articles from more than a few years ago you might be interested in as well on roughly three 'types' of fundamentalism:

http://sharperiron.org/article/three-lines-sand-part-1

http://sharperiron.org/article/three-lines-sand-part-2

http://sharperiron.org/article/three-lines-sand-part-3

Dave Doran replied to Joel Tetraeu, and that was filed to SI.  The ensuing comments are at: http://20.sharperiron.org/showthread.php?t=3974 

Joel wrote again a couple of years later - http://sharperiron.org/article/lines-sand-redux-plea-to-type-fundamental...

​If you skim the comments in the Tetreau articles, there are other links like this one between Todd Friel and Phil Johnson on Hyper-Separation.

You may also want to read Phil Johnson's "Dead Right" from the Shepherd's Conference.   There were some pre-discussion comments here; you can get the PDF of his remarks and the ensuing controversy here. Robert Sumner replied to that, as did Dave Doran.  There was also a Part II to "Dead Right" in 2006, which I just found out about this morning and has now moved to the top of my playlist.

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells