What Is Your Belief About the Future of the Jewish People in the End Times?

There are a variety of beliefs about God's plans for ethnic Israel and our understanding of eschatology.  We are not talking about what some call "spiritual Israel,' but people we identify as Jews who have some sort of Jewish heritage.

So where are you?

The Jews at the end of the Tribulation will be saved, Israel exalted as a nation in the Kingdom, a literal temple rebuilt, etc
53% (18 votes)
The Jews at the end of the Tribulation will be saved, Israel exalted as a nation in the Kingdom, no literal temple/sacrifices.
12% (4 votes)
The Jews will come to Christ at end of Tribulation, become part of church, no special ethnic destiny.
9% (3 votes)
No special plan for the Jews, just like everyone else in the end times.
3% (1 vote)
Undecided
15% (5 votes)
Other
9% (3 votes)
Total votes: 34
520 reads

There are 8 Comments

Aaron Blumer's picture

EditorAdmin

Went with option 1 but what would really describe my view is: "The Jews at the end of the Tribulation will be saved, Israel exalted as a nation in the Kingdom, uncertain about literal temple, etc"

To me, the first half of that is clear but the literal temple and sacrifices are substantially less certain.

RajeshG's picture

Aaron Blumer wrote:

Went with option 1 but what would really describe my view is: "The Jews at the end of the Tribulation will be saved, Israel exalted as a nation in the Kingdom, uncertain about literal temple, etc"

To me, the first half of that is clear but the literal temple and sacrifices are substantially less certain.

I also went with option 1, but my view is certainty about everything listed in option 1. I believe that a literal Millennial Temple is a key to a right interpretation of the entire Bible and is central to God getting all the glory that is due His name from all the nations of the world.

Ed Vasicek's picture

A pastor friend was preaching through Ezekiel on Sunday nights.  When it came to the temple measurements, he took the time to read it all.

His argument: If this is not a literal temple that is going to be built, what does it mean?

"The Midrash Detective"

JohnBrian's picture

Aaron Blumer wrote:

Went with option 1 but what would really describe my view is: "The Jews at the end of the Tribulation will be saved, Israel exalted as a nation in the Kingdom, uncertain about literal temple, etc"

To me, the first half of that is clear but the literal temple and sacrifices are substantially less certain.

I voted for 2 because of the inclusion of the word "sacrifices."  I accept a literal temple, but see no need for sacrifices.

CanJAmerican - my blog
CanJAmerican - my twitter
whitejumaycan - my youtube

ScottS's picture

I know both Aaron Blumer and John Brian question "literal sacrifices." In the case of John, he clearly stated he does "accept a literal temple." And yet, the book that contains the most information about a literal temple (Ezekiel) also contains the information on literal sacrifices (Ezek 40:38-43; 42:13; 43:18-27; 44:11, 15, 27-30; 45:13-25; 46:1-13, 20), some even for atonement (for the altar, 43:20, 26; for people (either everyone in the land, v.16, or possible just the princes, v.9), 45:15; for "the house of Israel", 45:17; and for the temple, 45:20).

I personally believe that Dr. Jerry Hullinger is on the right track about the purpose of these sacrifices. See his listing of articles under his biography page at PIU, paying special attention to those that relate to the Ezekiel and animal sacrifices (I believe there are six total articles listed).

The short summary of his position is that:

  1. Animal sacrifices in the Mosaic Law were in part for cleansing of the furniture items and the unclean people whom God was dwelling in the midst of (see Leviticus 16 for the cleansing aspects; also the affirmation of this in Hebrews 9:13, 22-23).
  2. During the millennial reign, God will again be dwelling in the midst of an unclean people. That is, the resurrected Christ will be living on earth amid some people who are mortal and not yet saved, as there will be people born in the millennium who need to come to faith themselves, many of which will not, as the rebellion after Satan's release at the end of the 1000 years shows (Rev 20:7).
  3. Because of #2, the altar and temple of the millennial period need atonement (cleansing) and the people not cleansed by faith in Christ need their flesh purified as the people of Israel did previously. So the animal sacrifices will again be doing temporary cleansing of those not yet covered by faith in Christ's atonement while Christ rules and reigns over them. This is the purpose of the temple during this time that Ezekiel discusses (and why there is no physical temple or animal sacrifices after the millennial period and the coming to earth of the New Jerusalem, Rev 21:22, as at that time, there is only the faithful, resurrected people).

I find the overall argument of Hullinger to be the most cogent argument for the purpose (and necessary literalness) of animal sacrifices during the millennial reign, especially those that speak of relating to atonement.

Scott Smith, Ph.D.

The goal now, the destiny to come, holiness like God—
Gen 1:27, Lev 19:2, 1 Pet 1:15-16

RajeshG's picture

ScottS wrote:

I find the overall argument of Hullinger to be the most cogent argument for the purpose (and necessary literalness) of animal sacrifices during the millennial reign, especially those that speak of relating to atonement.

I have not heard it explained this way before, but it sounds very plausible. I was going to post about the very same fact that Ezekiel 40-48 speaks about both the Temple and the sacrifices. Taking literally what it says about the Temple but not the sacrifices is not a consistent approach to interpreting the Bible.

RajeshG's picture

Ezekiel 43:10 Thou son of man, shew the house to the house of Israel, that they may be ashamed of their iniquities: and let them measure the pattern. 11 And if they be ashamed of all that they have done, shew them the form of the house, and the fashion thereof, and the goings out thereof, and the comings in thereof, and all the forms thereof, and all the ordinances thereof, and all the forms thereof, and all the laws thereof: and write it in their sight, that they may keep the whole form thereof, and all the ordinances thereof, and do them.

This passage highlights a key purpose of revelation about the Millennial Temple: it was given to the house of Israel so that they would be ashamed of their iniquities! 

Ed Vasicek's picture

[I have to go with our youth to a retreat today or I would write with more documentation. However, most of you probably can think of verses or other sources that will confirm what I say, even if you don't construct things the same way].

Most people confuse the sacrifice for sin, which is no longer necessary, with sacrifices in general.  (Hebrews 10:12, 18).

Sacrifices were for outward, ritual cleansing -- as well as having symbolical "shadow" meanings.  No person's soul was ever saved by an animal sacrifice.  They many have propitiated God's wrath for those here on earth, but they didn't deal with eternal destinies. In Christ, we no longer need God's wrath propitiated -- in earth or heaven.

The apostles offered sacrifices after the ascension of Jesus and were Torah observant. (cf. Acts 15 and Acts 21).  When Paul made a vow at the temple, for example, that included a sacrifice.

Acts 21:21-24, ESV, 

1 Our Jewish Christians here at Jerusalem have been told that you are against the laws of Moses, against our Jewish customs, and that you forbid the circumcision of their children. 22 Now what can be done? For they will certainly hear that you have come.

23 “We suggest this: We have four men here who are preparing to shave their heads and take some vows. 24 Go with them to the Temple and have your head shaved too—and pay for theirs to be shaved.

Offering a sacrifice cannot be wrong. We need to distinguish between what is wrong and what is unnecessary.

Just like the Sabbath, the truth is that every day is alike.  But one who observes a day does so to the Lord. I believe the Sabbath will be reinstituted during the Millennium, too.

In the Millennium, there will undoubtedly be an adjustment to the sacrificial system, something even the Jews believed. I cannot produce a source now, but there are several Talmudic quotations about the Messiah altering the Torah.

Some (later Jews) even believed they would be done away with:

. In Vayikra Rabba, sect. 9, fol. 153, and Rabbi Tanchum, fol. 55: "Rabbi Phineas, Rabbi Levi, and Rabbi Jochanan, from the authority of Rabbi Menachem of Galilee, said, In the time of the Messiah all sacrifice shall cease, except the sacrifice of praise."

It is an error to say God forbids or cannot reinstitute something that is not crucial for salvation or technically unnecessary.  Much of the Torah (like the dietary laws) were technically unnecessary and did not contribute toward salvation, but God still wanted Israel to observe them.

This does not deny the idea that all food is intrinsically clean -- as a matter of fact, God told Noah and family to eat animals without restriction.

"The Midrash Detective"