"This rather jaundiced view of Bible heroes may be a trend in upcoming screen versions of biblical stories"

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Ron Bean's picture

Sometimes we have promoted Old Testament personalities as paragons of virtue. From the time our children are young, we've extolled their virtues, which were sometimes minimal, and ignored their faults. Often this has resulted in a sort of hero worship in which the man comes across as greater than his God. 

The Judges were a motley bunch, with the immoral Samson and the child-sacrificing Jephthah in the lead. While Hebrews 11 doesn't refer to the sins of the faithful enshrined there, we shouldn't pretend these people were perfect. They were sinful people who were used by a gracious God.

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

Wayne Wilson's picture

I think God was actually the target of Mr. Bale's comments.  Moses wasn't perfect, but he was certainly a great man of God. 

 

Jay's picture

If Mr. Bale really believes what he said about Moses or God - then why did he agree to play the part he did?  It's not like he was asked to play the role of some 8th century Persian king or Indian Tribe leader.

 

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells

Wayne Wilson's picture

Jay wrote:

If Mr. Bale really believes what he said about Moses or God - then why did he agree to play the part he did?  It's not like he was asked to play the role of some 8th century Persian king or Indian Tribe leader.

 

I can think of three reasons:

1.  $$$$

2. Working with Ridley Scott

3. He likes playing off-beat, strange characters.

My oldest daughter thinks he's the bees knees (not her expression).