"Whatever our views may be on disputed issues ... we can be guilty of judgmentalism"

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RPittman's picture

So, what is judgmentalism? Its use, perhaps overuse, is so pervasive that it is a sort of buzz word to condemn anyone holding a contrary position. Are not those decrying judgmentalism also being judgmental?

Susan R's picture

EditorModerator

RPittman wrote:
So, what is judgmentalism? Its use, perhaps overuse, is so pervasive that it is a sort of buzz word to condemn anyone holding a contrary position. Are not those decrying judgmentalism also being judgmental?

I don't know who "those" are, but I think this article is a good "consider thyself" admonition. We often don't know why people do/don't do certain things, so our immediate disdainful and even hostile attitude toward them is unreasonable and inappropriately judgmental. Judgment not accompanied by mercy, compassion, humility, graciousness, and most importantly- the facts- is the basis for much unnecessary and God-dishonoring conflict.

Chip Van Emmerik's picture

Roland,

I appreciate your concerns. I would encourage you to read the book though. It is a quick, simple read that is very practical and very powerful - as is most (if not all) of Bridges' stuff.

Why is it that my voice always seems to be loudest when I am saying the dumbest things?

RPittman's picture

Susan R wrote:
RPittman wrote:
So, what is judgmentalism? Its use, perhaps overuse, is so pervasive that it is a sort of buzz word to condemn anyone holding a contrary position. Are not those decrying judgmentalism also being judgmental?

I don't know who "those" are, but I think this article is a good "consider thyself" admonition. We often don't know why people do/don't do certain things, so our immediate disdainful and even hostile attitude toward them is unreasonable and inappropriately judgmental. Judgment not accompanied by mercy, compassion, humility, graciousness, and most importantly- the facts- is the basis for much unnecessary and God-dishonoring conflict.
Susan, I really was not speaking against the article at all. (However, I would like to see someone else more closely define "judgmentalism" before I argue against it--my gut tells me that it is a buzz word loosely defined and used for connotation rather than denotation.) Rather, I was trying to co-opt it for my own point. Many times, "those" who argue against dress requirements, hair standards, or alcohol abstinence accuse their opponents of being judgmental whereas they are, in fact, being judgmental of their opponents. IMHO, this is precisely the thing Jesus is condemning in Matthew 7.

If being judgmental is to ascertain one's motives and thoughts behind behavior, then one cannot charge another with being judgmental without being judgmental himself. We practice the sin of which we accuse others. To determine that one is judgmental, the thoughts and motives must be known. Thus, the sin of being judgmental can only be judged by God and the individual. Susan, you are right! This is a matter for introspection, not in judging another. And, that is exactly the point I was trying to make!

Then, let us lay aside this accusation of being judgmental. We can only know our own hearts, not others'. It seems that this is what the article brings out.

Susan R's picture

EditorModerator

RPittman wrote:
Then, let us lay aside this accusation of being judgmental. We can only know our own hearts, not others'. It seems that this is what the article brings out.

Exactly. So I guess I'm kind of missing the point you are trying to make since the article already made it. It isn't about trying to figure out who else is being judgmental, but to consider ourselves as to whether or not we are judgmental.
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Judgmentalism is a sinfully “critical spirit, a condemning attitude”

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The point of this post is not to debate disputed positions; it’s about our disposition. It’s not about who’s right and who’s wrong; it’s about applying the gospel to our sinfully critical spirits and condemning attitudes.

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The sin of judgmentalism is one of the most subtle of our “respectable” sins because it is often practiced under the guise of being zealous for what is right.

I also appreciate the point he makes about 'holding our convictions in humility'. We can only be responsible for our own actions.