“Every generation is tempted to forfeit an essential component of orthodox trinitarianism. Our generation is no exception.”

"Taking its cue from social redefinitions of the Trinity, evangelicals have redefined the Trinity as a society, one in which each person has his own center of consciousness and will. As a result, a core doctrine like inseparable operations is foreign to many and sometimes held in disregard." - Credo

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TylerR's picture

Editor

Credo Magazine, Matthew Barrett, Craig Carter and others are on a quest of late to rescue Greek metaphysics and Nicene orthodoxy in theology proper. Along the way, they routinely present strawman caricatures of social Trinitarianism. They're each very well read, so I know they know better than this. For a real description of social trinitarianism, see my article from last year.

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and works in State government. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

pvawter's picture

Tyler, 

I'd like to know when your third article in that series is going to drop. Still waiting for the perfect explanation and illustration of the Trinity, lol.

TylerR's picture

Editor

I'm afraid I don't have a perfect explanation! It'll be a while before I continue that track. I'll likely do some piecemeal things; (1) word study of monogenes in light of Charles Irons' representations that it really does mean "only begotten," (2) a study of the passages on eternal generation and procession, and interaction with some theologians past and present, keeping discussion limited to exegesis, (3) then a study of passages throughout the canon, with emphases on the NT, about the immanant and economic relations, then (4) a survey of some recent pushback on the classical framework of understanding God (Brunner, Erickson, Nash, Feinberg, etc.) and (5) maybe a tentative conclusion. 

I'm afraid I'll have little to say that's original. For my money, after looking at a sampling of the Trinitarian responses in the 20th century, I think Erickson's monograph God in Three Persons is simply outstanding. I didn't say I agree with it, and I haven't yet publically taken a stand on my position in this forum (I have elsewhere, in my church, heh, heh), but his book is very very good.

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and works in State government. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?