Mozilla CEO steps down amid protest over gay marriage views

"Mozilla prides itself on being held to a different standard and, this past week, we didn’t live up to it" Fox

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Wayne Wilson's picture

Just deleted Mozilla.  Opera seems to work just fine.

JC's picture

Firefox is gone

Paul J. Scharf's picture

By the standards applied in this case, anyone who has EVER supported the Biblical definition of morality is unworthy of employment - even if they are now apologetic for doing so. Sadly, comments made both by Mozilla and Eich himself lend strong credibility and precedent to this anti-American position.

There is a brazen arrogance to the statement issued by Mozilla's Mitchell Baker that is difficult for me to handle, I confess. May the Lord give us mercy and wisdom.

Church Ministries Representative, serving in the Midwest, for The Friends of Israel Gospel Ministry 

Brenda T's picture

Recent events at World Vision and Mozilla appear to have gripped the American conservative Christian imagination.  The problem is, of course, that the principle in which Christians delighted in the former is that which they lament in the latter: The power of an economically significant lobby to drive the market in a way that impacts corporate decisions.

Christians should accept that those who live by the sword of legitimate economic sanctions in one context might well find themselves dying by the same legitimate economic sword in another. That is the price, or the risk, of freedom

Yes, we should lament the moral malaise of society; we should use our freedoms to try to reverse that; but we should also acknowledge that the methods we use to gain influence ourselves are also open to our enemies. And thus we should think twice about crying foul on that particular point when the results are not to our liking.

http://www.reformation21.org/blog/2014/04/living-and-then-dying-by-the-e...

JC's picture

How will you pay your mortgage and feed your family (buy and sell) unless you have a job?   How will you hold a job unless you ascribe allegiance to the beastly concept of same-sex marriage?   The true war is a battle for the mind.  Are we equipping Christians with the right tools for this coming war? 

dgszweda's picture

This is less about someone loosing their job because of their belief and more related to the fact that a senior executive required to fulfill his job and to guide his company for maximum shareholder profit was no longer able to do it, because of the distraction of his actions.  These things happen even outside of morality issues.  Once the distraction (whatever that may be) becomes to great and affects your ability to lead the organization, and once the board of directors feels that this distraction presents an issue for shareholders, than action must be taken.  As a senior executive this doesn't bother me at all, and I feel that he did the right thing.

Greg Long's picture

But the fact that it was such a major "distraction" is because the tolerance mob caused an uproar about something a man did 6 years ago based on his private beliefs. Keep in mind that at time even President Obama said he was against gay marriage. That doesn't bother you at all?

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Greg Long, Ed.D. (SBTS)

Pastor of Adult Ministries
Grace Church, Des Moines, IA

Adjunct Instructor
School of Divinity
Liberty University

dgszweda's picture

Greg Long wrote:

But the fact that it was such a major "distraction" is because the tolerance mob caused an uproar about something a man did 6 years ago based on his private beliefs. Keep in mind that at time even President Obama said he was against gay marriage. That doesn't bother you at all?

 

Nope!  Did you honestly expect anything different from the world?  In addition many of these types of things happen at the CEO level.  It is a very tenacious position to begin with.  CEO's often stay on or leave much more over the board's trust of the individual than over their performance.  This is not like a lower level position in a company where you are aligned to HR policies.  People have caused uproar's over much smaller elements, that have resulted in a CEO being let go.  A classic example is the misprint by Yahoo over their CEO's education credentials.  It caused enough problems, that they were let go.  This is why many executives are very careful in what they post online or how they interact with elements in their private life.  If you want the ability to do what you want in your private life, than don't become a CEO, a politician, the president.....  These elements will blur.

Greg Long's picture

Wow, we just have a major disconnect here. The issue is not that CEOs should or should not resign over personal opinions, "distractions," or loss of company trust. The issue is that a small donation six years ago to a political campaign due to what can only be assumed are his personal and/or religious beliefs resulted in the so-called "distractions" and loss of confidence. What if, to use a somewhat similar example, he was forced to resign because he donated $1000 to a church (which is anti gay marriage)?

Even some in the gay rights crowd are admitting how extreme and outrageous this is. Read Andrew Sullivan's take and the piece by a gay rights supporter in The Atlantic

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Greg Long, Ed.D. (SBTS)

Pastor of Adult Ministries
Grace Church, Des Moines, IA

Adjunct Instructor
School of Divinity
Liberty University

Greg Long's picture

P.S. So if I ever become a CEO, politician, or president, I shouldn't make public my opinion on gay marriage? The funny thing is, six years ago when this happened, a politician and presidential candidate named Barack Obama DID make his opinion known--he was (supposedly) against gay marriage, too.

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Greg Long, Ed.D. (SBTS)

Pastor of Adult Ministries
Grace Church, Des Moines, IA

Adjunct Instructor
School of Divinity
Liberty University

dgszweda's picture

Greg Long wrote:

Wow, we just have a major disconnect here. The issue is not that CEOs should or should not resign over personal opinions, "distractions," or loss of company trust. The issue is that a small donation six years ago to a political campaign due to what can only be assumed are his personal and/or religious beliefs resulted in the so-called "distractions" and loss of confidence. What if, to use a somewhat similar example, he was forced to resign because he donated $1000 to a church (which is anti gay marriage)?

Even some in the gay rights crowd are admitting how extreme and outrageous this is. Read Andrew Sullivan's take and the piece by a gay rights supporter in The Atlantic

We have lived in this evangelical American bubble for so long that we believe that this is a reality.  When in reality for the vast majority of history, and the vast majority in the world, this was already a reality.  Yes, it is sad that this is where we are getting to, but I think there is some naivety to thinking that we can 100% serve Christ, while at the same time stand at the top of the world and lead its key institutions.  We have had a great run over the last 200 or so years.  And I hope it continues, but it is not most likely a sustainable reality.  This is where our faith becomes reality.  Can we as Christians hold our beliefs, despite the fact that we will "lose" our life/lively hood. 

JC's picture

dgszweda wrote:

 Can we as Christians hold our beliefs, despite the fact that we will "lose" our life/lively hood. 

 

This is truely where we are now.

And Greg has a point.  We should also point out the hypocrisy and anti-Christian discrimination of the liberal ideology too.