Will expository preaching survive?

I remember Rick Warren asserting that Jesus preached topical sermons.  If learning what I have learned about midrash, I disagree with Warren.

But whether Jesus (or the writer to the Hebrews, for example) was doing exposition or not,  it seems as though expository preaching is not longer considered a sign of a good church -- at least not in the popular evangelical mind.

Will it survive at all?  Will it survive as a secondary form of preaching?

I have a friend in Wisconsin who left non-denom and baptist churches in the area and joined a Lutheran church, because the Lutheran pastor was the only one who actually preached the Bible (I assume she meant expository) preaching/teaching).

Dealing with a text (several verses to a chapter) is the domain of expository preaching.  Ideally, the main point of the text is the main point of the sermon.  Although there is a difference between expository preaching of a text and preaching book by book, we often associate expository preaching with both.

What are your thoughts?

 

Expository preaching is a man-made concept and does not need to survive, whether it does or not.
0% (0 votes)
Expository preaching will make a comeback.
17% (4 votes)
Expository preaching will survive, albeit in fewer churches.
50% (12 votes)
Expository preaching will survive, but not as a dominant preaching style (perhaps specific texts, but not bookstexts ).
8% (2 votes)
Expository preaching will be rare.
0% (0 votes)
Good riddance to expository preaching.
0% (0 votes)
Other
25% (6 votes)
Total votes: 24
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There are 2 Comments

Bert Perry's picture

I've heard expository sermons that are excellent, and I've heard some that were just awful.  Per this, I have to wonder if any apparent declines in the popularity of the same have a lot to do with how well it's done, and for that matter how well the practicioners go beyond it.  I'm all for looking at a passage in its historical and linguistic context, but it strikes me that we can have huge issues if we don't get it into its Biblical and systematic context.

It also strikes me that a fair amount of the "bad expository preaching" I've heard is actually topical preaching with lipstick on it so people might think it's expository, or worse yet, the preacher talking about what he wanted to talk about in the first place and ignoring the text almost entirely.  

At its best, though, expository preaching frees the pastor to follow the text instead of his biases.  Perhaps my conclusion is that I'm not "wed" to either expository or topical preaching (or other types), but I hope to see more good examples of expositional thinking in whatever sermons I hear (or preach) in the future.

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

Ed Vasicek's picture

It also strikes me that a fair amount of the "bad expository preaching" I've heard is actually topical preaching with lipstick on it so people might think it's expository, or worse yet, the preacher talking about what he wanted to talk about in the first place and ignoring the text almost entirely.  

I've heard my share of that sort of "expository" preaching too.  Your point is well taken.

"The Midrash Detective"