Making Disciples in a Millennial Generation , Part 1

From Voice magazine, Mar/Apr 2016. Used by permission.

We are facing a clash of generations in America. The Baby Boomers—the generation of “The Sixties,” Woodstock and The Beatles singing “You say you want a revolution”—are kicking and screaming into retirement;1 while the Millennials, the first generation of “digital natives”2 and the most-observed generation in history, are facing their 30s.3

Boomers don’t want to give up their positions of influence or control and Millennials don’t see value in Boomers’ old-fashioned methodology. Instead, the younger generation is creating a new way of doing things. This phenomenon is true with everything from pocket-sized computers (thinly disguised as cell phones) to the Church. Millennials are walking away from traditional churches en masse;4 plus, an entire new generation of pastors would rather plant new churches than minister in established, traditional churches.5

There is a prevailing paradox here that is so often true in today’s culture. Most Millennials seek out growing relationships with older adults as mentors.6 But, from my perspective as a longtime youth worker, these generations look at basic aspects of life and ministry very, very differently. I believe the different generations need each other, probably more than ever before.7 However, it often looks like the two are speaking different languages when it comes to church ministry.

We will look at some of the generational differences that will effect today’s ministry, and then we’ll consider what to do about it. But first, let’s define terms.

Millennials are those born between 1980 and about 1996.8 This cohort currently comprises almost 100 million people in the United States between the ages of 20 and 35. Baby Boomers9 are people born in the U.S. from 1946 to 1964, equaling around 80 million people.

A generation can be defined as a group of people who are approximately the same age who have encountered key historical events and social trends while in the same phase of life. Members of a generation are shaped in lasting ways by the major circumstances they encounter as children and young adults.10 For instance, the pivotal moment in the lives of most Boomers was the brutal assassination of President John F. Kennedy; while the most memorable moment for Millennials was undoubtedly the terror attacks on September 11, 2001.

It’s important to also understand that generations tend to look at life differently than did previous generations. Their perspective, priorities and values are typically not the same as those who have gone before.

This brings us to consider the generational differences facing today’s churches and church leaders. A quick look at some of the basic functions of church ministry will reveal that Millennials and Baby Boomers look at church programming very differently.

Mentoring

Boomers view mentoring as a sharing of knowledge in which the older people tell younger people what they need to know. Millennials crave personal relationships with significant, older people and want input into the conversations.

Evangelism

Baby Boomers believe that “witnessing” is usually a systematic presentation or outline. Millennials want to build growing relationships with unsaved people within existing communities.

Church Services & Programs

Boomers grew up in an era when structured church services filled their Sunday schedules (Sunday school, morning service, training hour or youth group and evening service). Millennials prefer one worship service each weekend and then want relational conversations in an accepting environment around a cup of coffee.

Leadership

Boomers tend to think that leaders should “pay their dues” before assuming positions of leadership. Millennials have been told they have much to offer and want a voice in influencing the direction of the church or organization.

Fellowship

Boomers seek out fellowship with people their own age. Millennials hunger for growing relationships with people from older generations.

Education and Equipping

Baby Boomers are used to classes and curriculum that are organized around different age brackets. Millennials find information online and want to learn via select relationships.

Discipleship

Boomers believe discipleship is built around a series of scheduled meetings. Millennials want to “do life together” with significant, influential leaders.

Let’s face it, these generational differences are considerable enough to cause havoc in many churches today. So what can Baby Boomer church leaders do to develop growing disciples from the Millennial generation?

Notes

7 See my book on this subject: Inter-Generational Youth Ministry: Why a Balanced View of Connecting the Generations is Essential for The Church, published by Overboard Ministries & Vision For Youth Publishing, 2013.

8 Including Tom & Jess Rainer’s The Millennials: Connecting to America’s Largest Generation, published by B&H Publishing Group, 2011.

9 For an important overview of these generational differences, see Paul Taylor’s book The Next America: Boomers, Millennials, and the Looming Generational Showdown, published by Pew Research / PublicAffairs, 2014.

10 The classic work on generational differences in this country is probably Neil Howe and William Strauss’ Generations: The History of America’s Future, 1584 to 2069, published by Quill, 1992.

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Mark_Smith's picture

Boomer 1946-64

Millennials 1980-96

What about the people born between (1964-1980)? Do we even get mentioned? Who mentored us? Who respected us? Who showed us the way?

Aaron Blumer's picture

EditorAdmin

That would be a different topic, though I suspect Mel's book gives some attention to Gen X/"Baby Busters." Part of the reason the Millennials get so much attention is that the trend of rapidly increasing departure from church involvement began with this generation reaching adulthood--or sharply increased at that point.

Maybe GenX is neglected.... being in that generation myself I never felt there was much interesting about it. Smile

Another angle that occurs to me is that the changes across generations may actually be more gradual than is sometimes suggested, with the result that the generation in between a couple of really different ones seems to be, on the whole, hard to distinguish from the one before and the one after. It may be fair to say GenX tends to disappear into the Boomers and the Millennials as far as attitudes/priorities etc.

Bert Perry's picture

Where does 1964-1980 fit in? (the generation that WISHES they could have voted for Reagan, of course)  

Mark also suggests a big question about our overall generational differences in the church; are we willing to pass the baton? It's worth noting that Paul's pastoral epistles are really little more than that quick SLAP of the baton into the next generation's hand--are we doing things Biblically? Or are we consolidating power, retaining authority because "we can do it better", and the like?  It's a big gut check we all need--a dear brother took me aside about 15 years back when I was a brand new deacon (still in nappies, so to speak), and he noted that my goal was to work myself out of a job.  

It's a great goal, and we ought to remember that when we do so, that doesn't mean we're irrelevant.  All too often, both young and old hold on to things that are really better passed on to others.

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

Darrell Post's picture

That was my reaction too...what about my generation? But I wasn't surprised really. I recently heard someone speak of Gen X as the forgotten, or skipped generation. We more or less respected our elders, waited for our turn, and just when we were getting of age to provide leadership in the church, millennials pushed their way through and shoved us aside. So it is a battle between boomers and millennials.

And if its true that millennials have a hunger to develop relationships with people from older generations, then I haven't met them yet. I hope its true.

 

 

Ron Bean's picture

Your post was a good perspective on the situation.

As to this:

And if its true that millennials have a hunger to develop relationships with people from older generations, then I haven't met them yet. I hope its true.

I am a boomer in a church full of millennials and enjoying our new relationships. We found that they were praying for more of my generation to join them. The only problem I've observed is not that they aren't welcoming to the older  generation, it's that my generation has trouble accepting any thing that's "different".

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

Larry Nelson's picture

 

In our traditional service, we have a member of our choir who on occasion sings as a soloist (during offerings, or what not).  She is twenty-something (so she is a "millennial"), and wonderfully talented, with "the voice of an angel."

What amused  some of the older folks in the congregation when she first joined the choir is that she dyes her hair bright pink.....

 

Darrell Post's picture

Ron, could you expand your comments a little more?

"We found that they were praying for more of my generation to join them."

What does this mean? Join them to what? Without having more information here, I am tempted to assume that there is a heart here that says, "we are hoping the old folks join us, but we have no interest in joining them. We are a fountain of wisdom, and these old folks are just out of touch, but we do like it when some of them do things our way."

 

"it's that my generation has trouble accepting any thing that's 'different'."

Ok, but could you give some examples of 'different'? What is it that the boomers are having trouble accepting? Is it stuff like millennials who hold a special service where they stay up all night listening to preachers? Or is it stuff that the older folks find unacceptable because it is worldly? Like when millennials come to church only half-dressed, exposing things they should save for their spouses?

 

 

Bert Perry's picture

....is that Ron's in a church that has been "discovered" by young people, and they've become aware that the church is imbalanced in terms of age and experience.  Whether it's an older, established church, or whether it's a new plant, I can't tell.  

And writing as part of Gen X, I can affirm that we all have trouble accepting things that are new as we get older.  Sometimes it's new fashions--black stretch pants and the like--sometimes it's music, sometimes it's just the fun habits they've got.  Trying to adhere to a truly Biblical worldview, instead of simply assuming that what we like is the standard, can be amazingly difficult.

And let's be careful about simply throwing the word "worldly" around--all too often, it's done without carefully considering what the Scripture says, especially when we're talking about music or clothing.  All too often, we simply decide that our generation's clothing and music (absent its worst caricatures) is Biblical, and the next generation's is not.  I'm guessing that young people pick up on that pretty readily. 

Plus, writing as someone who's ushered at a number of fundamental churches, let's just say that' I've had to divert my eyes from 40-somethings and even 60-somethings in the same way I have from teens and twenty-somethings.  Not to be fought out here IMO, but the church really needs to do a better job of describing "modesty" than simply to point to 1 Timothy 2:9's argument that women ought not rely on expensive adornments.  

(in contrast, what we tend to mean by "immodesty" is really pretty much free, if you catch my drift)

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

Darrell Post's picture

Bert, I would agree that it is Scripture that guides us. There are repeated harsh warnings throughout the NT about the Christian's relationship to kosmos--world. Contexts where the word means the ungodly society in which the Christian lives. The apostolic writers all get in on this. James, Paul, Peter, John, Jude. The overwhelming weight of what they are saying to us should give us tremendous pause, and out of love for Christ we should exercise restraint and carefulness. Not simply giving the Scriptures a quick glance at best, a sort of nickel-in, gumball out attempt at finding direction, and then rushing out to high-handedly exercise liberty because no verse was found that specifically outlaws stretchy pants by name.

So it matters not to me what my opinion is, or your opinion, per se, but rather, what does our precious Savior think of a particular choice? Are we really being careful with His commands? The topic of modesty is but one area that could be discussed, though it would be taking this thread in a direction not intended, so I will leave it alone. However, I agree that the problems in the church in this area are not limited to young people.

Ron Bean's picture

Darrell Post said:

"We found that they were praying for more of my generation to join them."

What does this mean? Join them to what? Without having more information here, I am tempted to assume that there is a heart here that says, "we are hoping the old folks join us, but we have no interest in joining them. We are a fountain of wisdom, and these old folks are just out of touch, but we do like it when some of them do things our way."

My Response:

My church was planted 9 years ago by a group that were millennials. (It's now self-supporting.) It's first two members were a 23 year old man and a 60ish year old woman. They wanted to reach out to other age groups, ethnicities, economic classes, etc. (BTW, you couldn't be more wrong on your snide "fountain of wisdom", "out of touch", and "our way" comments.) The two co-pastors (elders) prayed often for older, experienced people to join with them, desiring the wisdom of years and experience to help them in their efforts.

Darrell Post said:

"it's that my generation has trouble accepting any thing that's 'different'."

Ok, but could you give some examples of 'different'? What is it that the boomers are having trouble accepting? Is it stuff like millennials who hold a special service where they stay up all night listening to preachers? Or is it stuff that the older folks find unacceptable because it is worldly? Like when millennials come to church only half-dressed, exposing things they should save for their spouses?

My response:

I've been preaching for 30+ years and, as a boomer, found it different to preach without a tie. I have peers who have verbally berated me for being in a church where the pastor doesn't always wear a tie, where dress is typically business casual, and where some women wear pants.(Sorry to disappoint your expectation that we had immodestly dressed women in church.) We use a "worldly" acoustic guitar along with a piano, violin, and cello. And sometimes people will raise one hand (or maybe even both) during the singing.

I've also embraced a different view of church membership than I was used to. We have a rather rigorous "Introduction to Our Church" class that potential members must attend. We expect our members to forge meaningful, loving relationships with each other through interaction outside of church meetings. We also practice church discipline for things other than failing to attend church services.

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

Aaron Blumer's picture

EditorAdmin

One thing to keep in mind when talking about "generations," is the scale factor. What I mean is that similarities, differences, values, attitudes of a generation are projected from samples and averaged out across large populations. So "Gen X tends to me more... and less...." is descriptive of a large, spread out population. Likewise for Millennials.

That's useful information but translating into "these Millennials here in my congregation/neighborhood" is not a straight transfer. Each community is not a smaller version of the whole, but rather a portion of what makes up the whole.

As an analogy, the average IQ is said to be around 100. But a room of random people wouldn't all be 100's. You could have an east coast random group of 10 with IQ avg of 150 and a west coast random group with an avg of 90 and another somewhere else in between, etc. (And the low IQ group could get there by having 2 geniuses and 8 ... well, the other extreme)

So we should expect to find that attitudes that trend across a generation have many, many exceptions on both ends that balance eachother out into an average. In some places, the differences between GenX and Mill. might be dramatic on some points and in other places, barely noticeable.

Darrell Post's picture

Ron,

I was simply asking for clarification, which you provided. Thanks! I am glad it is working out well for you. My experience has been a little different. For years we have tried time and again to forge friendships and build relationships with millennials in our church, having them over for meals, fellowship after services, etc., but the drift we get over and over is that they would rather not have much to do with us. My impression is that they are pretty headstrong, they get their way, and are amenable to the older generations so long as they go along with what millennials want. Its not everybody, but just the message we get as a whole.

Bert Perry's picture

Larry: my 17 year old daughter was "Ringo" (a much cuter one I think) in a re-enactment of the iconic Abbey Road album cover.  She's not much of a narrator for Thomas the Tank Engine, no matter how much my 4 year old son pleads, though.  :^)  (Ringo was the original narrator for Thomas)

Which is a circuitous way of saying that millenials are not all their own world.  My family recently had a group of young ladies over for an all night knitting party, mixed with selfies and goofy fun.   The morning after, I treated them to my grandfather's waffle recipe....let's just say the kids I know generally appreciate the other generations, especially if food is involved.  I've also had good responses (having run when young myself) giving hints to kids on how to get better.  

Regarding Darrell's comment about "they are pretty headstrong, they get their way..." is that we all are.  Ask any quality engineer about the "hidden factory" he spends time unraveling.  We've pretended that we can do top down authoritarianism, especially in factories but all too often in the church as well, and in previous generations most people simply learned to feign obedience while getting things done the best way they can.

The difference today is that millenials really have little or no training in feigning obedience, and that's a huge blessing.  It means that we're more obviously forced to do what we should have been doing all along--trying to understand what makes a person tick and how the Gospel fits into that.

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

Greg Long's picture

Just a few relevant anecdotes:

  • A man in his late 60s recently asked to meet with me. He wanted ideas for discipleship materials because a young man in his early 20s who has been sitting next to him for several weeks at a weekly men's prayer breakfast asked this 60-something to mentor him. The man was shocked because it was kind of out of the blue (no prior existing relationship), but the young man saw something in him (one of the things he mentioned is that he saw all the notes the older man had in his Bible). Now, is that happening regularly at our church? No, but it is one example of what Mel wrote.
  • We are looking to hire a Pastor of Young Adults to shepherd the young (primarily single) adults in our church. The young adults themselves told us they don't want someone who's still in college; they want someone who's a little further along in life with some maturity who can give them guidance.

-------
Greg Long, Ed.D. (SBTS)

Pastor of Adult Ministries
Grace Church, Des Moines, IA

Adjunct Instructor
School of Divinity
Liberty University

Darrell Post's picture

Greg, thanks for sharing that!

Ron Bean's picture

The church I'm a part of has welcomed people Boomers into the Body. My wife and I are both in our 60's (although she doesn't look her age) and are constantly approached for advice and to share life experiences. As one of the elders, I'm always sharing those "I did that 30 years ago and here's what I learned" moments. 

We've had people our age join the church and fit in nicely. Both sides have had to "bend" a little but that's just part of "submitting to one another". I'm a Geneva 1599/KJV guy who's learned to enjoy preaching from other versions. I've realized that having a choir and "special" music wasn't as essential to worship as I thought it was. I haven't missed many of the Gospel songs I grew up with. (Heaven Came Down and Coming Again for instance). On the other hand "they" have enjoyed singing "How Sweet and Awfull is the Place" and have learned that the voices of the congregation shouldn't be drowned out by the musicians. I've also learned that God doesn't care if I wear a tie or if someone wears sandals to church. (WWJD?)

Sometimes the generational difference can be funny. When I was preaching on Psalm 51 and said that the reason I sinned because I was "Born this way", the audible chuckle in the congregation was amusement at my inadvertently having quoted Lady Gaga.

 

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

Bert Perry's picture

Regarding Mel Walker's general classifications of Millenial values versus those of Boomers, it strikes me that the relational emphasis of the new generation could be a HUGE benefit for churches that clue into it.  The trick is simple; churches have struggled for decades to get people to take discipleship and evangelism seriously, and part of the problem is that we connect discipleship and evangelism with programs.  So if we're not in those familiar four walls, it just doesn't cross our minds.

Millenials and like-thinkers have no such disability.  Once they learn how to do these in relationship, it's going to be part of their culture--something they almost cannot turn off.  That's huge.

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

Joel Shaffer's picture

Bert Perry wrote:

Regarding Mel Walker's general classifications of Millenial values versus those of Boomers, it strikes me that the relational emphasis of the new generation could be a HUGE benefit for churches that clue into it.  The trick is simple; churches have struggled for decades to get people to take discipleship and evangelism seriously, and part of the problem is that we connect discipleship and evangelism with programs.  So if we're not in those familiar four walls, it just doesn't cross our minds.

Millenials and like-thinkers have no such disability.  Once they learn how to do these in relationship, it's going to be part of their culture--something they almost cannot turn off.  That's huge.

 

Interestingly, most of the books about evangelism, discipleship, and missions that I've read over the past 25 or so years have emphasized the importance of relationships and de-emphazied programs.  I can even remember older books such as Paul Little's "How to Give Away Your Faith (1966)," Joe Aldrich's "Lifestyle Evangelism(1981)," and Rebbecah Manley-Pippert's (1979) "Out of the Saltshaker and into the World" all stressing relationships over programs and they were written  during the heyday of the boomers.  

Bert Perry's picture

I agree in toto with Joel on the fact that discipleship books of the 1980s and so on really were working to get past programs, and I'd add "Evangelism Explosion" and other tools I've used.  The one thing we missed is really, really simple; all too often, to teach personal, relational evangelism, we got 20 or 50 people in a room (or God forbid, 500) and we use a program style to try and teach people how to apply these tools in the ebb and flow of life.  It's like a proverb a brother of ours from Sudan shared with me 25 years back or so: "your actions are shouting so loud, I cannot hear what you are saying."

And so I am very, very happy to hear stories like those Ron and Greg have shared.

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

Larry Nelson's picture

 

Speaking as someone who is a member of a large and growing church, with that growth primarily being a result of reaching unbelievers, here's an issue I wonder about: to what extent (if any) should or can a church tolerate  any degree of what we might have historically or traditionally viewed as immodesty?  (Stay with me on this before dismissing the question...)

The fundamentalism in which I was raised viewed any type of pants on women or girls as being immodest (culottes sometimes being the dubious exception).  One of the very worst practices of the pants-on-women prohibition that I've seen existed at a local IFB church not far from my own.  A rule of their bus ministry was that even little girls (think "2nd graders") could ride the bus to Sunday School once or perhaps twice wearing pants, but thereafter were required to wear skirts or dresses.  When this expectation was conveyed to children's parents, can you guess how many little girls never returned? 

I likewise recall at least a couple of thundering tirades against open-toed shoes on women (which arguably said more about the preachers than the reputed problem). 

In more recent years, female pant-wearing seems to have greatly diminished as an issue, although it still is to some; and open-toed shoes carry nary a hint of opprobrium.  To an observable extent, our perception of immodesty has changed.

The church I mentioned above at one time made what I consider a woeful decision: at a certain point, they would rather maintain their church's dress standards than continue to minister to many unbelieving kids (not to mention their parents). 

Are we sometimes guilty today of making similar choices?

Understand I'm not advocating turning a blind eye if a woman walked into church wearing a bikini (although I've been told by a Hawaii church pastor that there such can occur!).  As the Usher Captain at one of our service times, I'm rather glad that I haven't had to face such a situation!  No, what I'm getting at is how do we react or what would we do if a woman walked in wearing a skirt that we see as being unacceptably short.  Or wearing a top that reveals more skin than we consider appropriate?  Do we glare, or otherwise make her feel unwelcome?  Or would we even turn her away?  For the sake of ministering to her need for the gospel, do we hold our tongues (and as needed divert our eyes)?  Should we? 

What about the person who isn't necessarily dressing immodestly, but simply not to our personal standards?  Since this thread is about Millennials, how do we react to the person with a nose or lip ring (or two)?  Or with dreadlocks?  Or hair dyed bright pink?  Or prominent tattoos?  Do we turn up our noses, or do we see past their outward appearance and predominantly see their need for Jesus (which isn't to say that many Christians are not without such accoutrements) and unreservedly welcome them?  If we really want to reach them, isn't the latter what we must sometimes do?

Just thinking out loud.  Thoughts? 

Greg Long's picture

Larry, we face those things on a weekly basis. I am doing a discipleship Bible study with two other guys including one who is tatted up and down. He is a new Christian who got saved and baptized recently. He has also recently starting serving as a member of our front-door greeting team, giving high fives to people as they come in--he loves it.

-------
Greg Long, Ed.D. (SBTS)

Pastor of Adult Ministries
Grace Church, Des Moines, IA

Adjunct Instructor
School of Divinity
Liberty University

Larry Nelson's picture

 

Greg Long wrote:

Larry, we face those things on a weekly basis. I am doing a discipleship Bible study with two other guys including one who is tatted up and down. He is a new Christian who got saved and baptized recently. He has also recently starting serving as a member of our front-door greeting team, giving high fives to people as they come in--he loves it.

 

That's what I'm driving at. 

Bert Perry's picture

Regarding Larry's note, it almost seems that most blue collar workers in outstate MN under the age of 40 have at least one tat.  Good luck doing ministry here if you get freaked out about that!  Plus, asking about what tats mean is a great way of getting to know people.  They usually are there for a purpose.  It's about Mom, Dad, brothers and sisters, children, and other loved ones here and gone.  Stained glass on the skin--not kosher, but are we under the Torah in this regard?

Plus, remember how Paul notes that a woman with uncovered head might as well have her head shaved?   I'm told that in Corinthian culture, that meant you were a temple prostitute, and I would hope that the church there had frequent "gut checks" when a new visitor walked in with a shaved head and really ratty clothes--the best she could gin up after fleeing her previous place of employment.   

It's hard for me to get worked up about yoga  pants, tattoos, or nose rings when I think about that.

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

JD Miller's picture

Darrel wrote of Millenials:

My impression is that they are pretty headstrong, they get their way, and are amenable to the older generations so long as they go along with what millennials want. Its not everybody, but just the message we get as a whole.

I think there is a lot of truth to that statement but the same thing could also be said of the boomers.  Consider this statement, "My impression is that the boomers are pretty headstrong.  They get their way and are amenable to the younger generations so long as they go along with what the boomers want.  Its not everybody, but just the message we get as a whole."

One of the dangers I have seen is that some boomers just throw out the accusation of worldliness in order to manipulate others and to get their way.  Millennials can do the same thing by throwing out the accusation of legalism.  We all need to set aside selfishness and get back to the Word and quit using the sacred Word of God to for selfish motives.

An example of the generation gap and forced preferences was at a business meeting I heard about that occurred a few years ago.  The church had recently gotten a technology update with a new projector.  An older influential man in the church said at the meeting that they would not use the projector to project the words of hymns on the screen because that could cause division in the church.  It is good I was not there, because I would have said that if anyone caused division over that they should be under church discipline.

Ron Bean's picture

Darrell's previous post is excellent! 

I've met a few millennials who are like the Athenians and always seeking "some new thing" and whose philosophy of ministry is based on the latest book they read. On the other hand, I've met a lot of boomers who seem to see any change as a sort of rebellion and view questions like "why do we do this?" as a challenge to authority they consider Biblical.

The reasonable millennials I know are aware of "boomer sensitivities" and are more than willing to listen and discuss concerns. The kind of response that was rarely demonstrated by my generation. 

Isn't unity through humble submission to one another supposed to be our practice?

Philippians 2:1-4

Therefore if there is any consolation in Christ, if any comfort of love, if any fellowship of the Spirit, if any affection and mercy, fulfill my joy by being like-minded, having the same love, being of one accord, of one mind. Let nothing be done through selfish ambition or conceit, but in lowliness of mind let each esteem others better than himself. Let each of you look out not only for his own interests, but also for the interests of others.

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

Crystal's picture

The next time somebody complains about Millenials, maybe remind them which generation linoleumed over all those beautiful hardwood floors.  

(Not original to me)

Aaron Blumer's picture

EditorAdmin

Too true. & thanks for the laugh!

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