Get Ready for the Great Reset (Part 3)

Read the series.

We have been considering the potential importance of the Great Reset, which has been promised to the world for this year of 2021, and is being discussed this week in virtual meetings for all who care to watch the proceedings unfold.

The Reset is a production of the World Economic Forum, and is backed by many leading figures from around the planet. Its planks include nearly every item that any globalist or climate-change activist could dream of placing on a wish list.

It is worth noting that—at one level—the gurus of the Reset have already foiled their own efforts by making such ostentatious guarantees that the movement could never live up to all of them. But perhaps they have already taken that into account—and are just trying to catch our attention.

Prof. Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the WEF, has invested his life in this defining moment, and offers the following admonition—which sounds much more like a warning than a promise:

People assume we are just going back, to the good old world which we had, and everything will be normal again, in how we are used to normal, in the old fashioned. This is, let’s say fiction, it will not happen….1

How should we as Bible-believing Christians—especially if we love Bible prophecy and approach it from the perspective of dispensational premillennialism—react to such ominous schemes and the pretentious people who envision them?

Well, we must commend them for their ambition, although certainly not for their embracing of the “doctrines of demons” (1 Tim. 4:1).2

Beyond that, however, what should we do? Specifically, can we say that such developments indicate that “the ends of the ages have come” (1 Cor. 10:11)?

Here, first, a word of caution is in order, as there is peril in running to the other extreme from the danger we examined previously—which we might sum up by the term last-days lethargy. At the opposite end of the spectrum, we find those overly zealous souls who are ready to make radical predictions—“beyond what is written” (1 Cor. 4:6) for us in Scripture—based on the assumption that the return of Christ must take place soon.

One sure-fire means of recognizing such a person is by watching for their affinity for date-setting. This is a most unfortunate ritual, which has reappeared more times throughout church history than we would care to admit—in spite of our Lord’s clear declaration in Mark 13:32:

But of that day and hourno one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only theFather.

For some Christians, however, the sense of unction to speak is too great of a burden to bear.

Such was the case with William Miller, a Baptist preacher whose zeal led him to schedule the return of Christ for Oct. 22, 1844. The resulting embarrassment—remembered in history as the Great Disappointment—led to the establishing of the Seventh-day Adventist Church and the Jehovah’s Witnesses.

Other, more contemporary examples of date-setting are equally embarrassing. However, before we exercise too much righteous laughter at their expense, we might reflect on the fact that no less a figure than Martin Luther—the great Reformer himself—is referenced approvingly in this regard by Seventh-day Adventist theologians, one of whom stated:

… Luther was so impressed by the impending doom that he opined that the end might come in the midst of the sixth millennium. According to Luther’s computation, the world was 5,500 years old in the year 1540, which was to be about the right time for the end of all things to occur.3

But we as believers today possess no such knowledge. We are only “to wait for His Son from heaven” (1 Thess. 1:10)—living in the hope that Christ could return at any moment to catch the true church up to heaven, to be with Him forever. This is our great and “blessed hope” (Tit. 2:13)—for which we long, but which we must never predict.

Thus, we are left asking if something like the Great Reset really provides any evidence at all regarding the nature of the times in which we live.

That will be the subject of our next installment.

Notes

1 Klaus Schwab; in “The New Normal Documentary by happen.network;” Truth Sceptics; 13 January 2021; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0cbIzJy-R0; Internet; accessed 27 January 2021.

2 Scripture taken from the New King James Version®. Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

3 Daniel Walther; “Martin Luther and the End of the World;” in The Ministry for World Evangelism vol. XXIV, no. 12, December 1951; p. 16. Retrieved from https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/MIN/MIN19511201-V24-… Internet; accessed, 28 January 2021. The statement references “Chronikon Oder Berechnung der Jahre der Welt” Werke, vol. 14, p. 714. See also “Martin Luther and the End of the World;” Ministry International Journal for Pastors; 3 June 2020; https://www.ministrymagazine.org/archive/1951/12/martin-luther-and-the-e… Internet; accessed 28 January 2021.

Paul Scharf 2019 Bio


Paul J. Scharf (M.A., M.Div., Faith Baptist Theological Seminary) is a church ministries representative for The Friends of Israel Gospel Ministry, serving in the midwest. He also assists Whitcomb Ministries and writes for “Answers” Magazine and Regular Baptist Press. For more information on his ministry, visit foi.org/scharf or email pscharf@foi.org.

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T Howard's picture

Paul J. Scharf wrote:
How should we as Bible-believing Christians—especially if we love Bible prophecy and approach it from the perspective of dispensational premillennialism—react to such ominous schemes and the pretentious people who envision them?

Well, we must commend them for their ambition, although certainly not for their embracing of the “doctrines of demons” (1 Tim. 4:1).2

Beyond that, however, what should we do? Specifically, can we say that such developments indicate that “the ends of the ages have come” (1 Cor. 10:11)?

Here, first, a word of caution is in order, as there is peril in running to the other extreme from the danger we examined previously—which we might sum up by the term last-days lethargy. At the opposite end of the spectrum, we find those overly zealous souls who are ready to make radical predictions—“beyond what is written” (1 Cor. 4:6) for us in Scripture—based on the assumption that the return of Christ must take place soon.

Paul,

Here are specific comments regarding your article:

  1. Your use of Scripture (see above) is taken out of context. The "doctrine of demons" in 1 Tim. 4:1 refers to the false teachings of apostates. You have neither demonstrated nor proven that the WEF is either a demonic organization or apostates promoting false teaching.
  2. According to Paul in 1 Cor. 10:11, the end of the ages HAS come (perfect tense, stative aspect). It's not a future event. We are currently living in "the end of the ages," regardless of the WEF.
  3. Paul's statement in 1 Cor. 4:6 is referring to how the church was evaluating its spiritual leaders. The only end times prediction in this passage was Paul's prediction that God would judge the faithfulness of his servants at the Lord's parousia (1 Cor. 4:5).
Paul J. Scharf's picture

T,

Sorry for the long delay in responding. I was traveling through Iowa, and (almost literally) blown away by the cold and snow!

In response, I do not consider it to be wrenching Scripture from its context, nor irresponsible in any way, to use the language—indeed, the very wording—of Scripture itself in writing a column such as this. I have always admired writers who can do this skillfully, and your type of criticism has never even crossed my mind. I would love to hear what others have to say about this, if indeed they also feel that it is a problem.

I have not stated that the use of these passages implies either a comprehensive teaching on them, or a complete fulfillment of them by the events described. I simply referenced the passages.

Your criticisms have gone from one end of the spectrum to the other in this series, with very little progress to show for it in terms of either of us growing in our understanding of the real issues and topic involved.

I wish you God's best.

Church Ministries Representative, serving in the Midwest, for The Friends of Israel Gospel Ministry 

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