Politics

Should Christians think biblically about our politics or think politically about our faith?

"The church, the body of believers, has a key role in the political process. But that role has to be marked by humility and reflection. It also has to be marked by a commitment to be more faithful to the Word of God than we are to either political party." - Bill Haslam

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Let Us Reason Together

For those who hoped that our experience of living in times of crisis might end with 2020, I do not need to tell you that your hopes have already been dashed.

We might consider the string of crises that date back to last March as separate events, or we might think of them as one multi-faceted whole. We might also discuss those who appear to have engineered them, manipulated them or benefited from them.

But one thing is for sure: We are living in a time of national crisis, and our way of life has been altered—likely forever—in ways that we could not have imagined 12 months ago.

The latest round of crisis erupted before us on Wednesday, as a day that many anticipated would bring high political drama somehow escalated into life-and-death chaos through an unprecedented assault on the United States Capitol building.

We who are only able to watch these events from afar wonder how many of them are largely gamesmanship—distractions to take our eyes off of the Great Reset that world leaders promise, beginning this month; or whether the promised reset itself is merely political theater.

It is very difficult to know what to say about any of these issues. First of all, do any of us have enough of the facts to say anything meaningful at all? Secondly, what might we say that cannot be disproven—or, at least, found to be obsolete—by the time it is posted? And what is there to be said, really, that has not been said a million times already?

Ah, there is the point!

2470 reads

The Cultural Consequences of Very, Very Republican Christianity

"It’s way too simple to say that it impairs the ability of Christians to reach their friends and neighbors. In some places it enhances the church’s appeal and integrates Christians within their community. In other places it creates a host of challenges and needlessly alienates Christians from their fellow citizens. It does something else . . . helps create the illusion that believers can in fact knit and wear a comfortable cultural garment on this earth." - David French

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Americans divided on pastors endorsing candidates; more pastors doing so in 2020

"Thirty-nine percent of Americans do not agree with pastoral endorsements even if it is outside their church role, according to the survey of 1,200 people conducted Sept. 9-23. Forty-three percent say it's appropriate and 19% are unsure." - C.Post

324 reads

LifeWay Research: More pastors endorsing candidates apart from church role

"Around a third of pastors (32 percent), however, say they have personally endorsed political candidates this year outside of their church role. That marks a 10-point jump from 2016 when 22 percent of Protestant pastors made an endorsement." - BPNews

326 reads

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