Coronavirus

Note

“Coronavirus” is actually a category of viruses, sort of like “Poodle” is a category of dogs. The virus popularly known as “coronavirus” is more precisely known as SARS-CoV-2 (though also referred to as 2019-ncov, for “2019 Novel Coronavirus”) and is in the coronavirus family. One of the best sources of information on the SARS-CoV-2 virus and the disease COVID-19 is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

The interactive data map from Johns Hopkins Center for Systems Science and Engineering (verified safe link) is also a great source of visualized data, close to “real time.”

Probably the best COVID-19 information in Canada.

Keep an eye out as well for Coronavirus Scams.

 

For related posts at SharperIron, see also COVID-19.


 

This Is a Good Time to Stop Getting Your Information from Ideological Zealots

All humans are political and ideological. We’re political in the sense that we have beliefs about the groups we’re part of—what those groups ought to have done in the past, ought to do now, ought to do in the future, and what sort of people should lead them. And we certainly have strong views about the groups we’re not part of.

We’re also ideological. Even the most down-to-earth among us hold to some big ideas, reject some big ideas, and look at the world through an ideological set of lenses. People’s worldviews range from highly rational, systematic, and coherent to highly random, chaotic, and contradictory, but we all have them.

And we’ve all got narratives we believe in that both flow out of, and sustain, our political and ideological commitments.

But something’s wrong if we let group identities, dogmas, and stories dominate our thinking to the point that we’re no longer able to recognize bunk (as in balderdash, hooey, flimflam) when it’s being sold to us by those we see as “our own.”

From where I sit, this seems to be a growing problem on “the right” these days. It’s probably an equal or greater problem on “the left,” but we’re primarily responsible for ourselves, and we’re supposed to be better than that.

1885 reads

Citing First Amendment, outspoken minority of pastors refuse to close churches amid pandemic

"A private test poll of 226 pastors conducted by Barna Research on March 20–23 showed that while a vast majority of pastors, 67%, have opted to close their churches to observe social distancing orders in light of the pandemic, 5% said their churches will remain open as normal." - CPost

Related:

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Coronavirus: Thoughts on God’s Responsibility & Purpose

These are sobering, uncertain, and anxiety producing times. I can recall nothing this severe in my lifetime. The coronavirus is a danger unlike anything our nation has faced for many decades. Some have likened it to conditions during World War II, and I can well imagine that to be the case. Nearly everyone is concerned about scarcity of supplies as they survey empty store shelves. Many are afraid of sickness and possible death. Others are panicking about the sudden evaporation of their retirement accounts. Fortunes have vanished in a moment. Some fear the break-down of law and order with rioting and looting. Gun sales have soared over the past several weeks. News report usually begin with pandemic updates along with accusations, finger-pointing, and blame-shifting. As Christians, we need to listen less to the voices around us, and more to the wisdom of God. Thinking biblically is the best remedy for our fears.

972 reads

We May Be Confused, but God Isn’t

"There is so much that we don’t understand. There is so much that we are incapable of understanding. So rest is found in trusting the Father. He is not confused, and he surely does have your best interest in mind. Yes, he will ask you to do hard things and he will bring difficult things your way, but he is worthy of your trust and he loves you dearly." - Paul David Tripp

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Recalling The ‘Habit Of Kindness’ De Tocqueville Saw In America

"In a time of crisis, however, we are thrown back on what is embodied and motionless. When we are no longer permitted to commute to work, we must turn again to the presences that exist alongside us: our housemates—be they family members or roommates—and our neighbors." - TAC

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