Books & Publishing

The Mixed Blessing of C. S. Lewis (Part 2)

(Read Part 1.)

As far back as 1963 Martyn Lloyd-Jones warned that C. S. Lewis had a defective view of salvation—and with good reason. Let’s take a look at several soteriological errors in Lewis’ theology.

The Substitutionary Atonement

In Mere Christianity Lewis was clear that he rejected the substitutionary atonement:

Now before I became a Christian I was under the impression that the first thing Christians had to believe was one particular theory as to what the point of this dying [Christ’s] was. According to that theory God wanted to punish men for having deserted and joined the Great Rebel, but Christ volunteered to be punished instead, and so God let us off. Now I admit that even this theory does not seem to me quite so immoral and so silly as it used to…. Theories about Christ’s death are not Christianity: they are explanations about how it works.11

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The Mixed Blessing of C. S. Lewis (Part 1)

There is probably no Christian in modern times better known or more influential than Clive Staples Lewis. Born in Belfast in the year 1899, Lewis would write dozens of books on a variety of topics before his death on November 22, 1963 (on the very day of the deaths of John Kennedy and Aldous Huxley).

At the time of his death his popularity was starting to wane but shortly thereafter there was a revival of interest in Lewis and, arguably, today he is more deeply admired than ever. He is considered by many to be the greatest apologist for the Christian faith to have ever lived.

Whether you agree with this assessment or not, there is no doubt that Lewis was in a league almost by himself in his ability to write great truths in ways that spoke to our hearts and opened our eyes. For this reason, even those who are troubled with much of Lewis’ theology can hardly resist quoting him. There is a danger, however, of all-but-canonizing Lewis, giving more weight to his imaginative explorations and philosophical reasonings than to Scripture. Ruth Tucker writes, “Among Protestants there is only one pope of apologetics…. If C. S. Lewis said it, it must be true. In many circles it seems that the voice of C. S. Lewis is second only to the voice of God.”1

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Dispensational Publishing House to Publish Andy Woods on Ezekiel

"DPH’s first volume will be written by Dr. Andy Woods, a prolific author who speaks nationally on Bible prophecy and related issues. Woods is the senior pastor of Sugar Land Bible Church in Sugar Land, Texas, a full professor at the College of Biblical Studies in Houston and an adjunct professor at Dallas Theological Seminary." DPH

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Review - 2015 NIV Zondervan Study Bible

The long awaited NIV Zondervan Study Bible (NIVZ) is finally here! This much anticipated Bible combines the most popular modern translation (NIV) along with a stellar line up of Christian scholars who provide a myriad of helpful contributions to help readers understand the Bible better. This study Bible is all about serving the reader in their understanding of the God that is glorified in the text.

The Editors

The NIVZ Study Bible was overseen by general editor D. A. Carson. Carson can, and has, ably written across a multitude of disciplines. He is rightly considered a scholar’s scholar by many. I pray the Lord raises up more like him and may the Lord give him enough life to bless the church and the academy with more of his writing. His assistant editor is Andy Naselli whose list of published works is growing. Presently, Naselli is teaching at Bethlehem College & Seminary. Naselli has two PhD’s and served as Carson’s research assistant for a number of years. Naselli is a budding scholar with a promising future ahead of him.

Together, Richard Hess and T. D. Alexander serve as the Old Testament editors; additionally Hess focuses on the archaeology and maps and Alexander focuses on the biblical theological aspects. Both men have cut their teeth on the Old Testament and are dependable scholars. The New Testament editor is none other than Douglas Moo who also handles the biblical theology for the New Testament. With previous history with the NIV, Moo is a NT theology and Pauline scholar.

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An Examination of David Bently Hart's "The Experience of God" (Part 2)

God is not, in any of the great theistic traditions, merely some rational agent, external to the order of the physical universe, who imposes some kind of design upon an otherwise inert and mindless material order. He is not some discrete being somewhere out there, floating in the great beyond, who fashions nature in accordance with rational laws upon which he is dependent. (234-235)

Notice that Hart has in mind the general consensus among theistic religions about God, not just the Christian God. I’ll comment a little on that below. Howbeit, the god who temporarily steps in at points in history to fill the void in our understanding of the world (the god of the gaps) is great to throw in the barrel and shoot at, but, then again, such a deity was dead before he/it got into the barrel anyway. As long as non-theists direct their logic against this immanent god, they miss the mark badly. As both Thomist and Van Tillian schools would agree, God is the eternally existing Fount of the laws of physics, of thought, and of morality. To proceed with the quotation:  

Rather, he is himself the logical order of all reality, the ground both of the subjective rationality of mind and the objective rationality of being, the transcendent and indwelling Reason or Wisdom by which mind and matter are both informed and in which they participate. (234-235)

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An Examination of David Bently Hart's "The Experience of God" (Part 1)

Among the most learned and entertaining—if not sometimes infuriating—writers on the theological scene today is David Bentley Hart. He is the author of such notable books as The Doors of the Sea, The Beauty of the Infinite, and Atheist Delusions. Alongside this is his impressive portfolio of articles (in particular for First Things). His “Christ or Nothing,” “Laughter of the Philosophers,” and “Daniel Dennett Hunts the Snark” are classics!

The present work investigates the very real transcendental features of Being, Consciousness, and Bliss. These three aspects of the human condition are fundamental to any true exploration and comprehension of reality. They also represent insurmountable obstacles to the naturalistic paradigm which holds sway in the minds of many within academe. In this post I shall restrict my comments to Being and Consciousness.

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