Sunday School Books- Shaping the Values of Youth in 19th Century America

From the Library of Congress http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/sundayschool/ American Memory collection -

Quote:

This collection presents 163 Sunday school books published in America between 1815 and 1865, drawn from the collections of Michigan State University Libraries and the Clarke Historical Library at Central Michigan University Libraries. They document the culture of religious instruction of youth in America during the Antebellum era. They also illustrate a number of thematic divisions that preoccupied nineteenth-century America, including sacred and secular, natural and divine, civilized and savage, rural and industrial, adult and child. Among the topics featured are history, holidays, slavery, African Americans, Native Americans, travel and missionary accounts, death and dying, poverty, temperance, immigrants, and advice.

Neat-O. And don't miss the essay link at the bottom- http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/ssb/?action=introessay]Shaping the Values of Youth: Sunday School Books in 19th Century America by Stephen Rachman, Department of English, Michigan State University. Food for thought.

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I'm reading http://www.amazon.com/Case-Books-Past-Present-Future/dp/1586488260/ref=t... ]The Case for Books by Robert Darnton with a notepad and ink pen in my hand. The main character of the book so far is Google Book Search, but he mentions quite a few online resources where large numbers of documents have been digitized and made available to the public.

Here's another one- http://valley.lib.virginia.edu/ The Valley of Shadows - a digital history project hosted by the University of Virginia that contains thousands of letters, diaries, newspapers, census and church records, etc from a Va (Confederacy) community and a Pa (Union) community dating 1859-1870.

AND THEN there's the http://publications.hul.harvard.edu/ar0809/open-collections-program.html Open Collections Program from the Harvard University Library.

If only I had nothing to do but read...