decision-making in the church - how to respond to a decision that is now obsolete

I've been able to do some thinking and writing on my work on decision-making over the Christmas and New Year break. I want to throw out a thought and get your response.

"Sometimes a decision is right when we made it initially but immediately after the decision is made, circumstances change the environment of a decision to such a degree that the initial decision is now obsolete."

The point I'm making here is that wise leadership will recognize when this happens and be willing to pull back instead of having "blind loyalty" to the initial decision.

Happy New Year & Straight Ahead!

jt

1663 reads
Kevin Miller's picture

If a decision is made obsolete so quickly after the decision was made, wouldn't that reflect a failure on the part of the decision-makers to take into account all the necessary factors that should have been considered in the making of the decision?

Rob Fall's picture

Kevin Miller wrote:
If a decision is made obsolete so quickly after the decision was made, wouldn't that reflect a failure on the part of the decision-makers to take into account all the necessary factors that should have been considered in the making of the decision?
It's called "walking the fire in", one long, one short, the next on target.

Hoping to shed more light than heat..

Joel Tetreau's picture

Kevin and Rob,

Yes, it may mean that the decision was made too quickly. That's probably what it usually means. However, I can think of a few times when we took months working through a decision only to find out a year or so later there was more "to it." Thanks for the response.

Straight Ahead!

jt

Dr. Joel Tetreau serves as Senior Pastor, Southeast Valley Bible Church (sevbc.org); Regional Coordinator for IBL West (iblministry.com), Board Member & friend for several different ministries;

Rob Fall's picture

The key is decisions are being made rather than an issue being kicked down the road for later action.

Hoping to shed more light than heat..

Susan R's picture

EditorModerator

Joel Tetreau wrote:
"Sometimes a decision is right when we made it initially but immediately after the decision is made, circumstances change the environment of a decision to such a degree that the initial decision is now obsolete."
jt

Joel Tetreau wrote:

I can think of a few times when we took months working through a decision only to find out a year or so later there was more "to it."

The use of the word 'immediately' was confusing. Circumstances changing over a year doesn't seem unusual to me. It is humbling, though, to abandon a course, especially if there was much effort put into it.

Ken Woodard's picture

For those who always must have a verse for everything consider this: Pauls missionary journies had as many changes in direction as a Duncan yo yo.

Yes, it is humbling to have to go back to a churh congregation and ask them to vote down a building addition that two years before, at your recommendation they voted unanimously to build. "Been there, done that."

"We walk by faith and not by sight"

Susan R's picture

EditorModerator

Sometimes it takes more courage to admit that things have changed or something is not working out as planned than to pretend everything is peachy while selling tickets for a long trip south in a handbasket.

christian cerna's picture

If there is good communication between the leaders and the congregation, mixed with humility, then there shouldn't be a problem just letting everyone know that plans have changed, and there needs to be a reworking of the goals/vision of the church.

Joel Tetreau's picture

Christian,

Right on!

Staight Ahead!

jt

Dr. Joel Tetreau serves as Senior Pastor, Southeast Valley Bible Church (sevbc.org); Regional Coordinator for IBL West (iblministry.com), Board Member & friend for several different ministries;