What does Scripture teach about all music without words?

Many Christians believe that all music without words is neutral or amoral. Some believe that all music without words is moral/good.

Many other Christians believe that all music without words is either moral or immoral, but not neutral or amoral.

What does Scripture teach about all music without words?

It teaches that all music without words is neutral or amoral.
0% (0 votes)
It teaches that all music without words is moral/good.
0% (0 votes)
It teaches that all music without words is either moral or immoral.
13% (2 votes)
It does not address this subject.
67% (10 votes)
It is not clear to me what Scripture teaches about this subject.
20% (3 votes)
Total votes: 15
5479 reads

There are 66 Comments

RajeshG's picture

It is very interesting to me that out of 6 people who have voted, not one person has voted for either of the first two choices. I would have expected that the results would have been strongly towards one of those two choices.

RajeshG's picture

In voting on the question in this poll, please keep in mind that this question does not merely concern musical styles, etc. It pertains to the entirety of the biblical data, which is much broader than narrower questions pertaining to musical styles originated by or played by humans.

Ron Bean's picture

I took the liberty of posting this poll with the clarification in a Facebook group composed of active and retired pastors and received the following responses:

--It does not address the subject 24

--It is not clear to me what the Bible teaches about this subject 1

--It teaches that all music without words is either moral or immoral 1

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

RajeshG's picture

Ron Bean wrote:

I took the liberty of posting this poll with the clarification in a Facebook group composed of active and retired pastors and received the following responses:

--It does not address the subject 24

--It is not clear to me what the Bible teaches about this subject 1

--It teaches that all music without words is either moral or immoral 1

These results are telling.

Ron Bean's picture

May I ask what are these results telling you?

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

RajeshG's picture

Ron Bean wrote:

May I ask what are these results telling you?

There is a major disconnect somewhere when 24 out of 26 pastors say that the Bible does not address this subject.

Rob Fall's picture

is the Russian Evangelical Christian-Baptists I fellowship with with not play instrumental music for which the congregation isn't familiar with the words.

 

Hoping to shed more light than heat..

RajeshG's picture

Rob Fall wrote:

is the Russian Evangelical Christian-Baptists I fellowship with with not play instrumental music for which the congregation isn't familiar with the words.

The biblical witness concerning music without words is not limited to music that was used/is to be used in formal worship settings. When answering an all-encompassing theological question such as this one, the entirety of what Scripture reveals about the subject must be considered to come to a proper understanding.

About your specific comment, I would tend to agree that people in churches should be presented the words to instrumental music that is ministered in worship services.

RajeshG's picture

If you are unclear about what Scripture teaches about the subject of this poll and are interested in discussing the subject privately, please contact me.

TylerR's picture

Editor

I think it's an excellent idea for anyone who has sincere questions about the topic here to seek answers from a balanced, informed source which has demonstrated credibility. There are good and bad sources of information. We must rely on the Spirit and our good sense to give us the discernment to reject sources with dubious credibility. 

There's always more to learn!

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and an Investigations Manager with a Washington State agency. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

JBL's picture

What kind of music does your church employ?  Is it Christ-honoring?  How do you personally know whether it is or not?

John B. Lee

RajeshG's picture

JBL wrote:

What kind of music does your church employ?  Is it Christ-honoring?  How do you personally know whether it is or not?

My church employs music that nearly all independent fundamental Baptist churches used to have and many may still have. We do not use any CCM, CWM, etc. We use a wide assortment of instruments in our music: stringed, wind, and percussion. 

We believe that our music is Christ-honoring. We would not use it if we had any questions or doubt about any aspect of it.

Answering your last question is not possible with a simple list or explanation. If you are interested in learning more, I have a vast number of articles that I have written on my blog that pertain to numerous aspects about what the Bible teaches about acceptable music for corporate worship.

Jay's picture

Now that's a funny post.  Anyone here use music in their church that ISN'T Christ honoring?  Anyone?  Surely SOMEONE here does.  

We use CWM at our church with stringed, wind, and percussion instruments.  Every week.  But I would put a fair amount of hypothetical money on a hypothetical table that Rajesh believes his church's musical standard is right and ours are wrong.

Maybe the real issue here is that I am not worried about remaining in the good graces of the Independent Fundamental Baptist movement.  If so, it's one of the better decisions I think I have made.

Give me a break on this music stuff.

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells

RajeshG's picture

Jay wrote:

Now that's a funny post.  Anyone here use music in their church that ISN'T Christ honoring?  Anyone?  Surely SOMEONE here does.  

We use CWM at our church with stringed, wind, and percussion instruments.  Every week.  But I would put a fair amount of hypothetical money on a hypothetical table that Rajesh believes his church's musical standard is right and ours are wrong.

Give me a break.

I wonder why you are commenting on my sincere reply to a question that was specifically directed to me. Perhaps it may be because you are interested in inciting more problematic interaction on SI directed toward me. If so, you are not behaving in a Christ-honoring way.

Ron Bean's picture

Jay's reaction was to your response, not to your person. 

This is just some advice from an elder.

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

RajeshG's picture

Ron Bean wrote:

Jay's reaction was to your response, not to your person. 

There was no problem with my response. I merely answered the questions that were directed to me. It's telling that he did not direct his response to the one who asked me the question about my church's music being honoring to Christ.

Jay's picture

At the risk of fueling this train wreck of a conversation, I will just note that JBL's original post didn't make me laugh and was actually quite good. 

And as for this:

because you are interested in inciting more problematic interaction on SI directed toward me.

You should note that was my first post in this thread and that I haven't bothered to vote in your poll either.  Furthermore, I am not the one starting new threads on music every couple of days, and it has been several days since I bothered to engage with you at all.

I'll duck back out now and do something more valuable with my time than engage with you on this subject.

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells

Joe Whalen's picture

RajeshG wrote:

..numerous aspects about what the Bible teaches about acceptable music for corporate worship.

Rajesh,

Will you please list the passages you believe the Bible addresses acceptable music for corporate worship?

Will you please list the passages you believe the Bible addresses unacceptable music for corporate worship?

I'm not looking for a write-up of what you think the passages teach.  I just want to see a list of where you think the Bible addresses either acceptable or unacceptable music for corporate worship.

RajeshG's picture

Joe Whalen wrote:

Will you please list the passages you believe the Bible addresses acceptable music for corporate worship?

Will you please list the passages you believe the Bible addresses unacceptable music for corporate worship?

I'm not looking for a write-up of what you think the passages teach.  I just want to see a list of where you think the Bible addresses either acceptable or unacceptable music for corporate worship.

Joe,

Here are some key passages:

Acceptable music for corporate worship – Ex. 15; Deut. 32; Judges 5; 1 Chron. 15-16; Ps. 1-150; Matt. 26; 1 Cor. 14; Eph. 5; Col. 3; Rev. 5, 14, 15; etc.

Unacceptable music for corporate worship – Ex. 32; Ps. 1-2; Is. 5, 23; Ezek. 33; Dan. 3; Amos 5, 6; etc.

To have a proper understanding of this subject, however, requires treating not just passages that talk directly about music but also everything that God says about acceptable versus unacceptable worship. Especially important in this respect are key passages such as Genesis 4, Genesis 8, and Romans 12:1-2.

It also requires treating passages that do not even talk about either worship or music but pertain to the subject in other important ways, such as Genesis 3 and 1 John 2:15-17, etc.

Furthermore, there are other key passages about music in the Bible that also have to be treated to have a comprehensive understanding of what God reveals about music that is acceptable to Him, such as 1 Samuel 10, 16; 2 Kings 3, etc.

Joe Whalen's picture

Rajesh,

Thanks for the list of verses.  From my review of them, I don't see any where God calls music "acceptable" or "unacceptable" to Him.  Perhaps you have more?  I've read all of them and can't see where God says the music was acceptable or unacceptable for Him. 

Where does God say that there is such a thing as "acceptable" music and "unacceptable" in His revealed Word?  If you can, please give us the list from the revealed Word of God, where God tells His people that some music is "acceptable" in their corporate worship and that some other music is "unacceptable".  Will you please take the time to do this?

RajeshG's picture

Joe Whalen wrote:

Rajesh,

Thanks for the list of verses.  From my review of them, I don't see any where God calls music "acceptable" or "unacceptable" to Him.  Perhaps you have more?  I've read all of them and can't see where God says the music was acceptable or unacceptable for Him. 

Where does God say that there is such a thing as "acceptable" music and "unacceptable" in His revealed Word?  If you can, please give us the list from the revealed Word of God, where God tells His people that some music is "acceptable" in their corporate worship and that some other music is "unacceptable".  Will you please take the time to do this?

You reviewed all of those passages (including all the Psalms) so quickly and studied them thoroughly and pondered them deeply in such a short time? Obviously, at most, you did a very surface analysis of them. 

I never said that you find in each passage that God explicitly calls it "acceptable" or "unacceptable" to Him. You are going to have to do a lot more study than you have done to understand what is acceptable to Him and what is not.

This much I will say to help you, but you are going to have to do the rest of the work yourself. My use of the concept of what is "acceptable" to God musically comes from an application to music of what passages such as Eph. 5:9-10 and Romans 12:1-2 reveal:

Ephesians 5:9 (For the fruit of the Spirit is in all goodness and righteousness and truth;) 10 Proving what is acceptable unto the Lord.

Romans 12:1 I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service. 2 And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable, and perfect, will of God.

Now, it's your job to study the passages and understand how the passages reveal what was accepted by God or what was not accepted by Him.

Ron Bean's picture

Since Exodus 32 was one of the initial passages brought up for our consideration, I've been studying it for awhile and came to this conclusion.

The worship of the Golden Calf ends in verse 6 when the people sat down to eat and then rose up to "party". As Moses concludes his undoubtedly long foot journey down from the mountain, law tablets in hand, he hears singing in verse 18. It seems to me that the singing is part of the debauched activities AFTER their worship of the golden calf and not part of their worship. 

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

Joe Whalen's picture

Rajesh,

I think I asked for a list of passages where God, in His revealed Word, says music is either acceptable or unacceptable to Him for corporate worship.

Can you produce such a list?  If you can, will you please? 

RajeshG's picture

Ron Bean wrote:

Since Exodus 32 was one of the initial passages brought up for our consideration, I've been studying it for awhile and came to this conclusion.

The worship of the Golden Calf ends in verse 6 when the people sat down to eat and then rose up to "party". As Moses concludes his undoubtedly long foot journey down from the mountain, law tablets in hand, he hears singing in verse 18. It seems to me that the singing is part of the debauched activities AFTER their worship of the golden calf and not part of their worship. 

That is not what Paul says under inspiration of the Spirit in 1 Corinthians 10:

1 Corinthians 10:7 Neither be ye idolaters, as were some of them; as it is written, The people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to play.

In commanding the Corinthians not to be idolaters (which mean to be "false worshipers"), he specifically cites Exodus 32:6. By doing so, Paul teaches us that their eating and drinking in a worship context what was sacrificed to the idol was part of their idolatry. By joining to that his mention of their subsequent playing, he teaches us that their idolatry also included their subsequent playing.

As I showed in my blog post, that playing included their singing.

RajeshG's picture

Joe Whalen wrote:

Rajesh,

I think I asked for a list of passages where God, in His revealed Word, says music is either acceptable or unacceptable to Him for corporate worship.

Can you produce such a list?  If you can, will you please? 

I already did. You need to study those passages to understand how He does so in those passages.

Jay's picture

That squishy noise you hear is the dead horse being beaten once again.  Pay it no mind.

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells

Joe Whalen's picture

Rajesh,

Why not just say, "No.  I can't produce that list of verses"?

Can we agree on this?  God addresses all kinds of things in the Law of Moses - what His people can, and cannot do.  Everything from how men were to cut their hair, how to segregate the crops in their field, how they must harvest their crops, how the fabrics of their clothing couldn't be mixed, what animals to bring for what sacrifice, what kind of animals to not bring, what day to rest on, etc.  On this I'm sure we agree.

And in the midst of all those commands, He never directly addresses music.  He never says what instruments His people cannot use in their worship of Him.  He never says what genres of music to avoid because those genres were used by the non-Israelites in their worship of pagan deities.   If God ever says this, where does He do so?

 Can we agree on this, that God never directly commands or forbids instruments, styles, and genres of music?

RajeshG's picture

Joe Whalen wrote:

 Can we agree on this, that God never directly commands or forbids instruments, styles, and genres of music?

No, we cannot agree on this. God directly commands His people many times about what instruments they were to use in worshiping Him. The Law was not the only authoritative revelation that God gave His people. Every command given by God subsequent to the giving of the Law was as much His will for them as anything in the Law was.

Joe Whalen's picture

RajeshG wrote:

God directly commands His people many times about what instruments they were to use in worshiping Him. The Law was not the only authoritative revelation that God gave His people. Every command given by God subsequent to the giving of the Law was as much His will for them as anything in the Law was.

Three follow up questions:

1) When God gave those commands, were the instruments the Jewish people commanded to use in the worship of the true God, were those same instruments used by their pagan neighbors in the worship of their false gods?  

2)  Where does God ever directly address musical instruments, genres, tonal patterns, beats, etc, that His people were forbidden to use because they were unacceptable to Him in corporate worship?

3) Do you agree that, at least in the Law of Moses, God never directly forbids any type of musical instruments, tonal patterns syncopation, scales, or genres?

Jay's picture

No, we cannot agree on this. God directly commands His people many times about what instruments they were to use in worshiping Him.

Where is this command?  Furthermore, how does the change in dispensations between OT Israel and NT church affect the command?

The Psalms record the use of many different instruments, and there are certainly references to music and instrumentation in the Bible, but where, explicitly, does God command the specific instruments that are to be used?  And if there are such passages, why is it acceptable for your church to use wind, percussion and stringed instruments and other churches cannot?

It's pretty clear, at least at this point, that the underlying presuppositions between Rajesh and (maybe) everyone else here on SI are such that there will never be agreement between us.

 

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells

RajeshG's picture

These are some of the passages in Scripture that command the use of musical instruments.

Psa 33:2 Praise the LORD with harp: sing unto him with the psaltery and an instrument of ten strings.

Psa 33:3 Play skilfully with a loud noise.

Psa 81:2 Take a psalm, and bring hither the timbrel, the pleasant harp with the psaltery.

Psa 81:3 Blow up the trumpet in the new moon, in the time appointed, on our solemn feast day.

Psa 98:5 Sing unto the LORD with the harp; with the harp, and the voice of a psalm.

Psa 98:6 With trumpets and sound of cornet make a joyful noise before the LORD, the King.

Psa 147:7 Sing praise upon the harp unto our God:

Psa 150:3 Praise him with the sound of the trumpet: praise him with the psaltery and harp.

Psa 150:4 Praise him with the timbrel and dance: praise him with stringed instruments and organs.

Psa 150:5 Praise him upon the loud cymbals: praise him upon the high sounding cymbals.

There is much more authoritative instruction elsewhere in Scripture as well.

As for the other stuff, I have not made any claims here on SI and am not going to take the vast amount of time that would be needed to discuss those matters properly. 

 

TylerR's picture

Editor

Rajesh; what is your objective criteria for style? How do you define concepts like "holiness" or "reverence" with regards to corporate worship music? 

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and an Investigations Manager with a Washington State agency. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

RajeshG's picture

TylerR wrote:

Rajesh; what is your objective criteria for style? How do you define concepts like "holiness" or "reverence" with regards to corporate worship music? 

Sorry, Tyler, answering these questions properly would require the detailed exegetical treatment of a vast amount of Scripture. In the Spring of 2018, I taught a 30-hour Bible college class on Acceptable Music for Corporate Worship. Of those 30 hours, more than 20 of those hours were spent directly going through passage after passage throughout all the Bible. Even then, I only had time to touch on many passages and could not treat them thoroughly.

You are welcome to read through the many articles that I have written that pertain to these subjects on my blog.

Craig Toliver's picture

RajeshG wrote:
In the Spring of 2018, I taught a 30-hour Bible college class on Acceptable Music for Corporate Worship. Of those 30 hours, more than 20 of those hours were spent directly going through passage after passage throughout all the Bible. Even then, I only had time to touch on many passages and could not treat them thoroughly

I'm sure it was a blessing

TylerR's picture

Editor

Was you dissertation on some aspect of music on corporate worship? Of course, you don't need to answer! I'm just curious. 

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and an Investigations Manager with a Washington State agency. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

RajeshG's picture

TylerR wrote:

Was you dissertation on some aspect of music on corporate worship? Of course, you don't need to answer! I'm just curious. 

No, not at all. My dissertation was, "Christ as God's Judical Agent: An Important Element of Apostolic Doctrine and Practice." Someday, I hope to publish a book based on it, but so far that has not happened.

JBL's picture

In the interaction I've had in the music debate, many anti-CCM advocates have taken the position of trying to define why a certain genre or style is ungodly.  I really question that approach.  I have found the pure biblical arguments for such unconvincing.  The arguments against CCM from the standpoint that it's too worldly, while possessing satisfying emotional appeal, lack logical consistency in derivation and application.

Furthermore, this strategy doesn't solve the more important issue of what is actually honoring to God.  Condemning CCM perhaps defines what is bad, but doesn't positively identify what is good.

So where does that leave us?

Ministries need to articulate precisely what it  is about their music program that honors God.  This is analysis that Aniol comes close to doing that churches need to think through themselves.  The end result will undoubtedly look  different for different ministries, but at the very least we would be able to understand where people are coming from in their music choices and gauge the consistency of those choices with their music philosophy.

John B. Lee

Ron Bean's picture

In the Spring of 2018, I taught a 30-hour Bible college class on Acceptable Music for Corporate Worship. Of those 30 hours, more than 20 of those hours were spent directly going through passage after passage throughout all the Bible.

Was this taught at a Bible college? Which one? Are recordings available? Being retired, I have the time to listen and would love to hear them. 

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

GregH's picture

Rajesh, what are the specific percussion instruments used at your church? Are there specific percussion instruments that are out of bounds for church?

RajeshG's picture

Ron Bean wrote:

In the Spring of 2018, I taught a 30-hour Bible college class on Acceptable Music for Corporate Worship. Of those 30 hours, more than 20 of those hours were spent directly going through passage after passage throughout all the Bible.

Was this taught at a Bible college? Which one? Are recordings available? Being retired, I have the time to listen and would love to hear them. 

Yes, it was taught through an interpreter at a Spanish Bible college here in Greenville, SC: COLEGIO UNIVERSITARIO BAUTISTA DE LA FE. Recordings are not available. This was my first time teaching this class. I hope to teach it again and have it recorded in the future.

RajeshG's picture

GregH wrote:

Rajesh, what are the specific percussion instruments used at your church? Are there specific percussion instruments that are out of bounds for church?

I do not know for sure what all the instruments are. I know that timpani are used with certain songs, and I think that cymbals and some kind of drum are used as well at times.

The answer to your second question is not a simple answer. Answering it properly would require a vast amount of careful discussion of Scripture. I continue to study what God has said, but I make no claim of having the fullness of understanding needed to answer your question thoroughly.

The more important matter is studying carefully and thoroughly what God has revealed to renew our minds about music that is pleasing to Him.

RajeshG's picture

JBL wrote:

In the interaction I've had in the music debate, many anti-CCM advocates have taken the position of trying to define why a certain genre or style is ungodly.  I really question that approach.  I have found the pure biblical arguments for such unconvincing.  The arguments against CCM from the standpoint that it's too worldly, while possessing satisfying emotional appeal, lack logical consistency in derivation and application.

Furthermore, this strategy doesn't solve the more important issue of what is actually honoring to God.  Condemning CCM perhaps defines what is bad, but doesn't positively identify what is good.

So where does that leave us?

Ministries need to articulate precisely what it  is about their music program that honors God.  This is analysis that Aniol comes close to doing that churches need to think through themselves.  The end result will undoubtedly look  different for different ministries, but at the very least we would be able to understand where people are coming from in their music choices and gauge the consistency of those choices with their music philosophy.

"I have found the pure biblical arguments for such unconvincing." Maybe that is because the arguments that you have heard have not fully treated the biblical data before moving to application, etc.

Many times, people want to quickly skim over the biblical data and move as soon as possible to discussing application at enormous lengths. The applicational tail is routinely made to wag the exegetical and theological dog and as a result God's people are left with a problematic lack of knowledge.

The Bible has all the essential information that we need to renew our minds about "what is actually honoring to God." The problems that we have with music are not due to a lack of needed biblical information. 

 

Jay's picture

Rajesh,

You said, in this post, the following:

God directly commands His people many times about what instruments they were to use in worshiping Him. The Law was not the only authoritative revelation that God gave His people. Every command given by God subsequent to the giving of the Law was as much His will for them as anything in the Law was.

When I pushed you on this, you later replied:

These are some of the passages in Scripture that command the use of musical instruments....

Those are NOT the same thing - not even close.  You originally stated that God commands the use of certain instruments.  That was also the question posed to you by Joe, and Joe circled back to it again a little later so I'm fairly sure we were on the same page.  Responding to his questions by listing passages that refer to instruments used in OT worship is not even close to what the original question was.

If you don't agree with Joe or others, that's fine.  But answer the actual question posed, and not something else. 

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells

Jay's picture

I'm getting a little annoyed at Rajesh's insistence that we take into account all the Biblical data.  He mentioned a list of passages earlier (26 to be exact, if you include the entire book of Psalms as one unit).

When someone mentioned that they were taking Biblical passages into account, Rajesh got snarky and rude:

"I have found the pure biblical arguments for such unconvincing." Maybe that is because the arguments that you have heard have not fully treated the biblical data before moving to application, etc.

He then did it again with Tyler:

Sorry, Tyler, answering these questions properly (emphasis in original) would require the detailed exegetical treatment of a vast amount of Scripture. In the Spring of 2018, I taught a 30-hour Bible college class on Acceptable Music for Corporate Worship. Of those 30 hours, more than 20 of those hours were spent directly going through passage after passage throughout all the Bible.

I'll grant that I don't have a PhD in New Testament Introduction, but I have very serious and strong reservations about teaching that all the pertinent Scriptures (Rajesh's words on several occasions) must be taken into account before we can draw any application from it.  I don't think that is generally what we mean when we talk about the perspicuity of Scripture, and it seems as though this "prevent defense" of appealing all possible passages before we can make an application is a dangerous road to go down.

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells

RajeshG's picture

Jay wrote:
Responding to his questions by listing passages that refer to instruments used in OT worship is not even close to what the original question was.

If you don't agree with Joe or others, that's fine.  But answer the actual question posed, and not something else. 

These verses do not just "refer to instruments in OT worship." Every single verb in every verse that I posted in that reply about commands is a Hebrew imperative. Those are all commands that command that musical instruments be used in worshiping God.

I did answer the actual question posed.
 

Jay's picture

Edit:

One quick correction - the second link that I put up for Joe is wrong.  It should point here instead.

Those are all commands that command that musical instruments be used in worshiping God.

Again, that wasn't the original question, and this is now the third time you're dodging it.  The original question - which is why I linked to Joe's posts earlier today - is "are specific instruments commanded to be used in worshiping God".

Original comment:

So then to not use one of the instruments (let's say a harp since it is cited in Ps. 98:5 and 150:3, among other passages) would also be a sin of omission, correct?  That is where your logic inevitably leads us.

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells

RajeshG's picture

Jay wrote:

I'm getting a little annoyed at Rajesh's insistence  . . .

I am more than a little annoyed that you are in the process of hijacking another of my threads. This thread is not an invitation to you (or anyone else for that matter) to talk about whatever you want to and in the process hijack the thread. 

Earlier, you said that you did not even participate in the poll in the OP of this thread. I am not sure why you felt it was relevant to tell me that information. In any case, you have no business commenting further on this thread unless you have something to say that pertains directly to the subject of the thread.

Pages