"No amount of concern for the future of the Church can justify supporting evil men."

David French: "Evangelicals, Where Is Your Faith?" National Review

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Bert Perry's picture

On one side, we have a guy who may have fondled two girls who were under age.  On the other, we've got a guy who's pro-abortion, supports Obamacare (including "you get the fun, we bill a nun" executive order), and favors minimum wage increases that would put a LOT of people in Alabama out of work, not to mention nationwide.

Choose your poison, I guess.  Barring a third party candidate of impeccable morals, the choice they've got is a grandstander who may have done some hideous acts, or a grandstander who's come out clearly in favor of hideous acts like abortion.   It's a lot like last November.

Aaron Blumer's picture

Few agreed with me in November, but there was then and is now a third option. When two options have problems, but one is clearly better than the other, we choose the better one. When two options are both too evil to back, we are not required to support either of them.

Yes, there's the counter that "not backing A results in the dominance of B." But who's fault is that situation? Not mine as a voter. There are no perfect analogies for the situation but imagine a guy who gets bonked on the head and kidnapped. When he wakes up, he's tied to a chair and an evil madman says "I'm going to either drop a bomb on your village or I'm going to put deadly poison in the water supply. Which would you like me to do?"

The obvious answer is "neither." But if our hapless victim says that, is he responsible for the results?

The GOP embraced madness and sold its soul to Mephostopheles. Voters are not to blame for the outcome if they refuse to support any of the options they've been given.

Jay's picture

I thought David French’s article was incisive and timely.  Now we find out if anyone will actually heed his warning.

I used to put stock in the whole “if you don’t vote for Reagan you are in effect voting for Carter” argument, but both sides these days look like a choice of Scylla or Charybdis.

Gandalf, in his argument with Saruman during the Fellowship of the Ring movie, mentions that it seems as though the choices are to submit to Sauron or submit to a power crazed Saruman.  He refused both.  I hope we have the sense to do the same.

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells