The Good Samaritan and the Good Samarians

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TylerR's picture

Editor

I have to take a close look at this one. I just covered this parable during family devotions, as we went through the Gospel of Luke. My initial reaction is to be very cautious, because I am generally skeptical about "parallel-o-mania." But, I'll take a look at it - and your article, too! Smile

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and an Investigations Manager with a Washington State agency. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

Ed Vasicek's picture

TylerR wrote:

I have to take a close look at this one. I just covered this parable during family devotions, as we went through the Gospel of Luke. My initial reaction is to be very cautious, because I am generally skeptical about "parallel-o-mania." But, I'll take a look at it - and your article, too! Smile

This is an important point to ponder, especially when a Jewish audience is involved.  The average Jewish layman had the entire Torah memorized and was very, very fluent in the rest of the Old Testament.  The rabbis had the entire Old Testament memorized, as well as part of the Talmud.  The School of Hillel embraced his principles of interpretation, one of which that similar wording between texts would connect them.   If you really, really knew your Old Testament and heard the parable of the Good Samaritan, the connection would be instant.  As it is, most of us are not fluent when it comes to Chronicles, so that is why, IMO, we do not immediately see it.  I am not asking you to simply embrace this, but I am asking you to ponder this.

 

"The Midrash Detective"