Why more parents are home schooling their children

There are 8 Comments

Bert Perry's picture

Around where I am, it seems to be holding steady, but no great gains.  That said, the Rochester, MN area has been a hotbed of homeschooling for a while, so we probably ought not expect huge increases year after year anymore.

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

pvawter's picture

I'm not sure if what we do "counts" as homeschooling. Granted, my kids are all educated by my wife and I at home, but they are also enrolled in a public charter school that offers the opportunity to take classes at home or in a traditional classroom in the district. So far, we have not actually put them in any classes, but we may consider some extras as the kids get older.

For some homeschool purists, we may not qualify, but imho we do. Smile

Ron Bean's picture

It appears to me that the increase in homeschooling also has had a large impact on the Christian day school. 

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

Joel Shaffer's picture

That is true, but then certain Christian day schools are also adjusting and finding ways to partner with those who homeschool.  For example at the Christian school that two of my kids attend (we can't afford to send our youngest yet), has a 2 day home and school hybrid program and a 1 day enrichment program.  http://www.npchristian.org/academics/homeschoolprograms.cfm

This has also led  some home schooling parents choosing to send their child to Northpointe Christian once they are in middle school and/or high school.  

Northpointe has also seen an increase in enrollment among African-American and Latinos this year who have traditionally gone to public and charter schools.  The transgender bathroom in the schools public debate has been the trigger for several of these parents choosing to invest in a Christian education for their child.   

 

Ron Bean wrote:

It appears to me that the increase in homeschooling also has had a large impact on the Christian day school. 

RickyHorton's picture

Joel Shaffer wrote:

For example at the Christian school that two of my kids attend (we can't afford to send our youngest yet), has a 2 day home and school hybrid program and a 1 day enrichment program.  http://www.npchristian.org/academics/homeschoolprograms.cfm

We have seen some schools popping up that are a good step for those that have been homeschooled but want to move into a classroom setting.  The school my children attend is similar to the hybrid program you describe.  It is a university model school where they have classroom instruction 3 days out of the week and then they work at home the other 2 days.  You can read about this type school at http://naums.net/.  The school my kids go to is http://www.libertyprepnc.com/.

  

Bert Perry's picture

pvawter wrote:

I'm not sure if what we do "counts" as homeschooling. Granted, my kids are all educated by my wife and I at home, but they are also enrolled in a public charter school that offers the opportunity to take classes at home or in a traditional classroom in the district. So far, we have not actually put them in any classes, but we may consider some extras as the kids get older.

For some homeschool purists, we may not qualify, but imho we do.

Instead of saying that it does or does not qualify, you simply have to know the risks.  Friends of mine did the charter home education option, and one thing they found was that it was the same materials used in the local public school.  In their case, it was whole language reading and the new math, and they had to do a lot of work to actually get their kids reading and ciphering.  In another case, what was found was that the public charter imposed a schedule no less stifling than that of traditional public school.  

On the flip side, I remember a school district in Colorado that really got on the bad side of the teachers' union because they moved to Saxon for all students.  Despite the fact that there's nothing church-specific about Saxon math, they pushed to get it out--I'm guessing in great part because math scores shot up.  Repetition and doing basic arithmetic does wonders.

In other words, how a charter like that works out really depends on what goes in.  If it's the same old for public school, watch out.  If it's allowed some independence, good things can happen.

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

pvawter's picture

Bert,
That independence is key for us. At this point, we are participating in this program because we get to pick our curriculum and set our own schedule. If that changes, we will simply go it alone.

Bert Perry's picture

....for what it's worth, is simply to note that if parents understand that the responsibility for their child's education falls on them, and that failure to do this well results in your child being unable to support himself (and will live at home), then they are for all practical purposes homeschooling.  My late mother, by spending a huge amount of time taking me to Chicago's museums, private German lessons, and the like, homeschooled me, although she'd probably never have described herself that way.

(how's that for purism?)

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.