There’s a Legal Cure for Woke Corporations’ Religious Discrimination

"If you stay in the legal trenches long enough, you learn a central fact of our cultural conflict: Intolerant overreach often breaks the law. An effective legal response to such intolerance often takes time to generate, but when it comes, it can break waves of discrimination and lawlessness." - David French

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T Howard's picture

Let's hope and pray that corporations understand and agree with what French writes.

I recently received an email from our HR department, which in part reads:

Quote:
Behavior that would be unacceptable at work is also unacceptable off-the clock. Harassing, bullying, discriminating against or otherwise disrespecting a colleague, customer, vendor, contractor, or business partner electronically, off company property or off-the-clock is also prohibited. While the company respects your privacy, if you violate our Code or this policy you may be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination regardless of when or where that conduct occurs.

So, anything I might say, post on SM, or preach from our pulpit that is viewed by "a colleague, customer, vendor, contractor, or business partner" (ie pretty much anyone) as harassment, bullying, discrimination, or disrespectful could get me fired.

I understand the need for this, but I'm concerned that this policy could be weaponized against those who hold to biblical Christianity.

Bert Perry's picture

My guess is that they will understand after a few companies are separated from a few million bucks apiece in adverse lawsuits.  Most companies aren't willing to stand up to vocal minorities on behalf of quiet pluralities and majorities, let alone quiet significant minorities.  

And since this hasn't happened yet, let's just say I don't get into online arguments with LGBT activists and the like.  I did a couple of times way back, and let's just say that I realized that not only was I running the risk of being "doxxed" (have people send a note to company HR, etc..), but quite frankly I wasn't persuading anyone of anything they didn't already believe.  There are ways of figuring out whether someone who holds a different position is willing to interact in good faith, or whether they're just out there to beat up on someone.  

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

T Howard's picture

Bert Perry wrote:
And since this hasn't happened yet, let's just say I don't get into online arguments with LGBT activists and the like.  I did a couple of times way back, and let's just say that I realized that not only was I running the risk of being "doxxed" (have people send a note to company HR, etc..), but quite frankly I wasn't persuading anyone of anything they didn't already believe.

SI and my personal blog are the only "social media" outlets I use. Even with these I'm careful with what I post and what identifying information I use / disclose. When I was on facebook, I did have a few discussions with former friends who are now homosexuals, and those discussions ended with them unfriending me.

The biggest concern I have is that my sermons are posted on-line and are accessible to anyone. While I won't self-edit because of this, I'm concerned that at some point those sermons may become a liability for my career. But, these are the choices I make and the risks I take as a bi-vocational elder.