Dog Breed Specific Legislation, and saying "Good-Bye" to our dog

Yesterday afternoon we were leaving on some errands, and our dog found a spot behind a bush where she could jump our fence, presumably because she wanted to come along for the ride. Some neighbors were outside, and they came into our yard to ‘help’ us get her back, but this was a BAD move on their part. My kids were outside, and Cozy is very protective of them, so she was nipping at the neighbor’s heels and really barking. It doesn’t matter that she is only 7 months old- she has a deep growly bass bark that is very intimidating. So the lady across the street called animal control, and when the officer arrived, we found out that owning a dog that has any pit bull or bull terrier blood in them in the state of Ohio requires the owner to 1) have a locked, covered enclosure such as a kennel 2) carry $100,000 liabliity insurance. Cozy is a beagle/bull terrier mix.

We can’t afford that expense (insurance would be about $400/year, plus an addendum to our homeowners, plus additional fencing and building a kennel…), or the neighbors to be constantly concerned about our dog (we have the kind of neighbors that report people for having too many dandelions on their lawn). We let animal control take her and hopefully find a pit bull rescue organization who will keep her. The reality is that she will probably be put down some time next week- but we have a few days to try to find a place for her because of the weekend.

My husband is upset, and the kids and I have cried just about all night. Cozy was really still a puppy, and she was doing her job as a guard dog. But the law is the law. So I guess this is a general information thread for anyone considering adopting a dog in a state with breed specific legislation, and a prayer request for us, because we are heartbroken. I have contacted a few agencies, like Ohio Valley Dog Owners Inc, and am trying to find a reputable pit bull rescue to take her. Some pit bull rescues are just fronts for people who want to fight dogs, and we don’t want to her go to a place like that. Maybe we will be able to find a solution, but I am not particularly hopeful right now.

 

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dcbii's picture

EditorModerator

I'll be praying for you guys. That would be really tough to take.

Dave Barnhart

Susan R's picture

EditorModerator

My husband told the guys at work about what happened, and one of them has a friend with some acreage in a nearby county. She said she would go adopt our dog. It made the kids feel better to know she might get rescued.

Only one of our friends knew that there was such legislation in Ohio, and she said that some health insurance companies won't cover people with a dog of a breed considered to be dangerous. My understanding after talking to animal control and a few rescue agencies is that if a dog is a mutt, but has the physical characteristics of a dog on the 'dangerous and vicious' list- if you can't prove that the dog does not have that breed in its bloodline, you can be required to meet the state's guidelines for that breed. IOW, if a Heinz 57 looks a bit like a bull terrier or German Shepherd or is 'wolfy', they'll treat that dog as if it is that breed. It might be a good idea for dog owners to check into this in your state.

Diane Heeney's picture

Glad there is some hope on the horizon for you, Susan. That legislation seems...uh...squirrely to me. You need to move to WY...they like wolves here. :~

"I pray to God this day to make me an extraordinary Christian." --Whitefield http://strengthfortoday.wordpress.com

Susan R's picture

EditorModerator

It proved to us that we sometimes take things for granted that we shouldn't- it never occurred to us that there might be such a thing as breed specific legislation, but just Googling "pit bull legislation Ohio" gave me tons of information that we should have taken a look at before we agreed to adopt her- we took her at 3 weeks old because the mother rejected the litter, which is also why we were a bit impulsive about this decision. I don't regret it- she's a great dog, and made us very happy, in spite of all the shoes and pieces of clothing she ate. I'm glad she is going to be alive and happy somewhere else- I did miss her very much this morning- she slept on the floor next to my side of the bed, and always stuck her nose in my face as soon as the alarm went off. She was my little buddy.

From October cake and Cozy

Diane Heeney's picture

With a face like that, how could you resist being "impulsive"? Smile For various reasons, we had to adopt out our cocker spaniel puppy when I was very small. I don't remember it...but I do know that they had found a good family for her, and that was a great consolation, especially to my brothers.

"I pray to God this day to make me an extraordinary Christian." --Whitefield http://strengthfortoday.wordpress.com

Angela Stewart's picture

I really hate the legislation against specific dog breeds. As far as I'm concerned, legislation should only be punitive, i.e., if your dog causes problems, then the law goes into effect. While certain breeds do have the potential to be vicious, no dog is born vicious. I find it sad - and offensive - that there are actually counties/districts where it is illegal to own pit bulls at all. Pits are one of the most loyal, loving dog breeds there are. It's that intense loyalty that makes them so easy to train bad behaviors.

I am so glad you found a happy resolution for Cozy. She looks like an absolute doll baby. Hopefully her new owners will be able to continue her training so she will learn how to treat strangers.

I am siezed with an urge to go home and hug my doggie hard. Smile