Why I Still Wear A Tie To Church

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Mark_Smith's picture

What is unhygienic about a tie?

Mark_Smith's picture

When pastors, elders, and average male church goers are physicians, then we can worry about it.

 

I think you all just can't handle anything that remotely "smells like" tradition. Throw it all out!

TylerR's picture

Editor

Bibles carry pathogens, too. Think about it - when was the last time you gave your Bible a good scrubbing down?

  • Think of all the awful pathogens it carries around.
  • Think of how long you've had it!
  • Think of how long you've carried it back and forth between church and home! 
  • Think of all the times it's fallen on the floor in the backseat amongst the wrapper and . . . stuff that usually accumulates on the floor
  • Think of that time you were sitting through the sermon, thumbing through your Bible at church after using the restroom and discovering they were out of soap! 
  • Consider the germs you're spreading by your irresponsible Bible carrying habit!
  • Oh, the humanity! 

I say we ditch Bibles altogether - the pathogens are too risky. 

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and an Investigations Manager with a Washington State agency. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

Ron Bean's picture

The churches and Christian schools I served in required me to wear a tie. I have glaucoma. My new occupation doesn't require a tie nor does my church. My eyesight has been saved!

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

Jim's picture

That's why I go barefoot ... even in the winter time!

How Dirty Are Your Shoes?

In a recent study, researchers at the University of Arizona found nine different species of bacteria on people's shoes. These types of bacteria can cause infections in our stomachs, eyes and lungs. The study also found bacteria live longer on our shoes than in other places. As we walk, we constantly pick up new debris that feeds the growth of more bacteria. The researchers tested to see if bacteria on shoes would transfer to the tile floors in a house. More than 90 percent of the time it did. Carpeting harbors bacteria even more.

Seriously I don't care whether someone wears a tie to church

TylerR's picture

Editor

Cas are also full of pathogens. So are the pews at church. So are the hymnals. Away with them! 

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and an Investigations Manager with a Washington State agency. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

Jim's picture

The deep research behind the article. 

The author says ...  (the first sentence ... mind you!)

In an age when shorts, sweatpants, and bare midriff (sometimes all at the same time) are considered acceptable attire for most churches,

I'm guessing he had his researchers fan out across America .... yeah the entire world ... to find out that churches do not have a policies in place prohibiting shorts, sweatpants, and or (wait for it) bare midriffs. I'm sure he wrote to 4th Baptist Church and discovered that even in our bulletin set today was our church covenant ... AND indeed there is NO prohibition on bare midriffs. And like most churches we actually have people in the pews dressed like this ... (note the cross ... these guys are real worshippers!)

 

And the author's solution to this pressing problem is ... to NOT "stand out like a wooly mammoth" by wearing a tie!

Jim's picture

"It is seldom that we in America get to suffer anything for the Saviour who suffered so much for us.  The least I can do (and I mean the least) is to honor suffer for Him by "  tying a cloth around our neck and pulling it as tight as we can until we are blue in the face. 

 

Andrew K's picture

TylerR wrote:

Bibles carry pathogens, too. Think about it - when was the last time you gave your Bible a good scrubbing down?

  • Think of all the awful pathogens it carries around.
  • Think of how long you've had it!
  • Think of how long you've carried it back and forth between church and home! 
  • Think of all the times it's fallen on the floor in the backseat amongst the wrapper and . . . stuff that usually accumulates on the floor
  • Think of that time you were sitting through the sermon, thumbing through your Bible at church after using the restroom and discovering they were out of soap! 
  • Consider the germs you're spreading by your irresponsible Bible carrying habit!
  • Oh, the humanity! 

I say we ditch Bibles altogether - the pathogens are too risky. 

Humorous, but irrelevant.

Generally you don't eat or breath in constant proximity to your Bible, car, hymnal, etc..

Furthermore, the materials of a Bible generally aren't fabric, so it doesn't give germs so easy purchase.

My objections to ties are mostly tongue-in-cheek, but I truly do wish fashion would move on. They're a nuisance.

Mark_Smith's picture

There are few fabrics that you cannot wash in cold water. I have a little laundry bag that zips up. You put a tie or two in there and wash. No problem. Just don't put it in the drier.

Mark_Smith's picture

I think you are tying that knot a little too tight...  :-)

I have never been uncomfortable in a shirt with the right neck size and a tie. I don't get the aversion. I love it.

Sean Fericks's picture

When in Rome...  Modest dress is dressing in a fashion that does not distract, and that is appropriate to the situation.  If you are attending an IFB church in Greenville, chances are that a tie will not be distracting, and wearing one may be necessary if you want to fit in.  If you are attending a church in Elko, Nevada (non-LDS), chances are that people might think you are the pastor if you wear a tie.  Different norms for different cultures.

Personally, ties are uncomfortable.  I always disliked wearing them.  I think they are unnecessary.

Mark_Smith's picture

You act as though someone said if you don't wear a tie you are a sinner at worst, or don't love God at best. Did some one say that to you? If he did he is a fool.

 

 

Mark_Smith's picture

What do you recommend for "formal wear" for men?

Remember men, the ladies are out there dressing well. What do we have?

Jim's picture

Mark_Smith wrote:

You act as though someone said if you don't wear a tie you are a sinner at worst, or don't love God at best. Did some one say that to you? If he did he is a fool.

Honestly I really don't care if men do or don't wear ties. I mean I really really don't care. I don't and I am OK with that. Other men do and I am OK with that too. 

Larry Nelson's picture

 

Jim wrote:

That's why I go barefoot ... even in the winter time!

Actually, if we truly wish to honor God and be respectful to Him, there is Biblical precedent for going barefoot:

"Then he said, “Do not come near; take your sandals off your feet, for the place on which you are standing is holy ground.” (Exodus 3:5 ESV)

Smile

 

Bert Perry's picture

It's worth noting that if your shirt fits, your tie does not compress your neck. Just sayin'.

Aspiring to be a stick in the mud.

RickyHorton's picture

Mark_Smith wrote:

I think you all just can't handle anything that remotely "smells like" tradition. Throw it all out!

In my opinion, the problem is when someone requires tradition just for tradition's sake and it is masked as a spiritual issue.  Not saying that is what is going on here, but that is the times when I can't handle anything that remotely smells like tradition. 

TylerR's picture

Editor

Ricky wrote:

In my opinion, the problem is when someone requires tradition just for tradition's sake and it is masked as a spiritual issue

Amen to that. You should have seen the reaction when I altered our prayer meeting format and had the church actually . . . pray together as a group, rather than splitting off into groups of men and women. Judging from the reaction, you'd have though I'd burnt a Bible and poured whiskey on the ashes from the pulpit . . . while wearing a tie. 

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and an Investigations Manager with a Washington State agency. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

JD Miller's picture

Let us make sure to remember that a neck tie is the world's standard for what it means to dress up, not God's standard.  That does not make it bad (even though they originated from worldly French mercenaries), but it should also remind us that we can still be dressed up without a tie.  I live in South Dakota, and a nice western sport coat with a nice (not ripped or faded) pair of jeans is considered dressed up.  If you go to certain places in India- rather than wearing a tie- they would wear a colorful robe to dress up.  No doubt, the tie has a much more universal recognition than the western sport coat or the Indian robe, but it has that recognition based on man's standards, not God's.

Craig's picture

Exactly where did this "Sunday-go-to-meeting clothes" idea originate? Is it a tradition or doctrine? As long as a believer dresses in a neat and modest manner what else would matter? Where is the scripture for "dressing your best for God"? Where is the scripture that says you've got to dress up even if it is uncomfortable? I have no problem if someone wants to wear a tie. They have that liberty just like I have liberty not to wear one. Basically the article is a reaction that goes from one extreme to another. They see the sloppy dress of some and decide they will counter with their Sunday best! I understand the importance of modesty, but do you really believe God is impressed with your Sunday best clothes? If you do then that's a good sign you're wrong on the inside.

Lee's picture

It's about reverence, people.  Reverence is a common denominator to legit worship from beginning to end in Scripture. It is applied in many forms, and dress is one of them. 

The issue is not that every culture has different identities of reverence, as per someone's previous comment comparing Indian attire with western attire, but that every culture has some identity of reverence. It recognizes reverence even in something as banal as attire. For example, some years ago I sat in a courtroom and observed a young lady cited (and charged) for contempt of court on nothing but what she wore to the courtroom. 

I've no issues one way or the other about a tie as a fashion statement.  There is certainly nothing intrinsically spiritual about a tie.  However, in many (if not most) venues that trumpet the virtue of tie-lessness the worship emphasis inclines towards planned irreverence.  I have issues with anything that seems to purposefully diminish reverence.

Lee

Jim's picture

This is for any pastor reading this ... 

Have any of you ever said to someone ... "you are irreverent for not wearing a tie"? (or a suit)

I doubt it! 

And if not why not?

  • You're a chicken?
  • Or it's really not that important?

Extended challenge: have any of you ever said to someone ...

Now tell us about it here ...

KD Merrill's picture

Craig wrote:

Exactly where did this "Sunday-go-to-meeting clothes" idea originate? Is it a tradition or doctrine? 

I believe it originated in the Old Testament, where God Himself described His plan for the priestly garments (Exodus 28).  No one is claiming that the passage directly applies to believers in this dispensation; however, it isn't unreasonable to draw some conclusions/principles regarding God's expectations of those who serve Him in an official capacity.   Does it require a tie?  No - but it doesn't mean we approach the subject of our physical appearance before a Holy God lightly.  Furthermore, we're a royal priesthood.   Does our appearance during corporate worship support that statement, given the OT precedent?

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