Crown College of the Bible awarded TRACS candidate status

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TylerR's picture

Editor

I have friends who have graduated from there. I am glad to see the Lord blessing their work down in Tennessee. 

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and an Investigations Manager with a Washington State agency. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

Joel Tetreau's picture

Congrats to Crown! I'm happy to see this institution move in this direction. This move will be a help both to the student body as well as to the institution as a whole. God bless and Straight Ahead!

jt

Dr. Joel Tetreau serves as Senior Pastor, Southeast Valley Bible Church (sevbc.org); Regional Coordinator for IBL West (iblministry.com), Board Member & friend for several different ministries;

Chip Van Emmerik's picture

I've been pleased to see Christian colleges finally taking the step toward accreditation. Unfortunately, they are still about 20 years behind the curve. Most places now require regional accreditation. The paradigm has shifted; I hope the Christian colleges catch up more quickly this time.

Why is it that my voice always seems to be loudest when I am saying the dumbest things?

Andrew K.'s picture

Agreed. In my experience, TRACS doesn't count for much. I know it's neither fair nor convenient, but in order to be relevant today, Christian colleges are going to have to go all the way. As great an experience as I had at my school, I don't know if I could recommend it to others based on this issue alone. The truth is, you don't know where you will be ten years from now, and having a regionally accredited degree can suddenly become very important.

神是爱

TylerR's picture

Editor

I got my BA in Emergency & Disaster Management while I was in the service. Having a degree, or at least a trade, in a field is very important. I would recommend for anybody, especially young men leaving high school and looking to go into the ministry, to join the military for four years for two reasons; (1) learn a trade of some kind you can use throughout your life if you have to be bi-vocational, and (2) get GI Bill money so you can afford a quality bible college or seminary without spending anything for it. I wouldn't want to enter the ministry crushed with debt.

If you know a trade, TRACS might not be a bad idea. It depends on your situation.

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and an Investigations Manager with a Washington State agency. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

dmyers's picture

Or is their position more nuanced?

Chip Van Emmerik's picture

It's a somewhat nuanced version of KJVO. Not nearly as antagonistic toward dissenters, but just as rigid positionaly. 

Why is it that my voice always seems to be loudest when I am saying the dumbest things?

Ron Bean's picture

What does accreditation mean?

In my experience, accreditation of any sort permits the parents of students attending such school to avail themselves of tax breaks that are not available at unaccredited schools but may or may not mean that the education at said school is "better". In at leat one state it is possible for schools, day care centers, and colleges to practice a form of self-accreditation.

"Some things are of that nature as to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." John Bunyan

Andrew K.'s picture

Not meaning to be even more cynical, but I believe any honest look at the state of higher education in the US will inevitably make one... quite cynical. Smile

Accreditation is nothing more than a discrimination tool (though I don't mean that in an exclusively negative sense, what with the rise of diploma mills and internet qualifications). Nonetheless, the unfortunate reality is that it is very important and becoming increasingly more so.

神是爱

Chip Van Emmerik's picture

Totally agree - but the reality is that regional accreditation (as opposed to national accreditation) is almost always required now for certification and access to graduate school. 

Why is it that my voice always seems to be loudest when I am saying the dumbest things?

Lee's picture

Like vehicle inspections, accreditation is hardly more than an officially sanctioned scam.  That being said, an officially sanctioned scam is basically a necessary evil.  If you're in the education marketplace, just hold your nose and do what you gotta do.

Lee

TylerR's picture

Editor

Accreditation is not a scam; it ensures the quality of the education. It may do noting more than ensure you get a quality liberal education in the Bible, or it may also ensure you get a quality conservative education. Regardless, there is a clear difference between schools that are accredited and those which are not.

Generally speaking, accreditation means the education you pay for is of better quality. You may not agree with the doctrine of the institution, but that has nothing to do with the quality of the education itself.

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and an Investigations Manager with a Washington State agency. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

Jim's picture

Lee wrote:

Like vehicle inspections, accreditation is hardly more than an officially sanctioned scam.  That being said, an officially sanctioned scam is basically a necessary evil.  If you're in the education marketplace, just hold your nose and do what you gotta do.

 

I don't agree that vehicle inspections are a scam (Minnesota, where I reside, does not have them)

This may interest you:

 

http://www.firstcoastnews.com/news/article/263581/82/Minnesota-trooper-p...

 

Photos:

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150917098448144.411045.159745...

 

Pennsylvania study: 

 

http://www.dmv.state.pa.us/pdotforms/inspections/Inspection%20Program%20...

 

Based on the model results, Pennsylvania can be expected to have between
115 and 169 fewer fatal crashes each year, corresponding to between 127 and
187 fewer fatalities each year, than it would if it did not have a vehicle safety
inspection program;

Lee's picture

Jim wrote:

Lee wrote:

Like vehicle inspections, accreditation is hardly more than an officially sanctioned scam.  That being said, an officially sanctioned scam is basically a necessary evil.  If you're in the education marketplace, just hold your nose and do what you gotta do.

 

I don't agree that vehicle inspections are a scam (Minnesota, where I reside, does not have them)

This may interest you:

 

http://www.firstcoastnews.com/news/article/263581/82/Minnesota-trooper-p...

 

Photos:

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150917098448144.411045.159745...

 

Pennsylvania study: 

 

http://www.dmv.state.pa.us/pdotforms/inspections/Inspection%20Program%20...

 

Based on the model results, Pennsylvania can be expected to have between
115 and 169 fewer fatal crashes each year, corresponding to between 127 and
187 fewer fatalities each year, than it would if it did not have a vehicle safety
inspection program;

 

Okay, you've made a believer out of me.  The Minnesota vehicle inspection program ensured that an unlicensed driver could never get on the public roadways in a vehicle such as that which is at best a public nuisance, at worst a tragedy waiting to happen.

 

Let me qualify my statements: the NC vehicle inspection plan is a scam.

 

Lee

Jim's picture

Here's my take on accreditation:

  • From the definition: "to recognize (an educational institution) as maintaining standards that qualify the graduates for admission to higher or more specialized institutions or for professional practice"
  • The example of a Bible major at an unaccredited school: If it is the terminal degree and the service area (where the person gets a job) is "the Bible", accreditation is probably not important. (Man graduates with a degree in the Bible and becomes a missionary)
  • The example of someone going into a profession (eg. accounting):

    • Here accreditation matters. When applying for a job or seeking licensure (say a CPA)
    • Majors where accreditation matters: Nursing, Teaching, Accounting, Finance, Computer Science, Engineering, etc.
  • Accreditation matters additionally when:

    • One wants to transfer credits OR
    • Apply for a follow-on degree in another institution. Eg. Student graduates with a Bachelor's degree in Accounting from BJU and they want to apply for a Master's program at a secular institution

    A personal example: I have a family member who is applying to MIT for a Master's program

    Chip Van Emmerik's picture

    Jim wrote:
    Majors where accreditation matters: Nursing, Teaching, Accounting, Finance, Computer Science, Engineering, etc.
    You can add education to that list, for both certification and "follow-on" degrees.

    Why is it that my voice always seems to be loudest when I am saying the dumbest things?