Review - Darwin's House of Cards

Image of Darwin's House of Cards: A Journalist's Odyssey Through the Darwin Debates
by Tom Bethell
Discovery Institute 2016
Paperback 294

The widespread public acceptance of biological evolution in Darwin’s day was probably a product of the simultaneous faith in Progress. Darwin’s theory was accepted as readily as it was because it shared in the general belief that things were getting better. It’s not that the organisms themselves were being swept along, but that European and then American intellectuals believed that everything was improving. (256)

This is the way Tom Bethell ends his entertaining book attacking the reigning scientistic consensus of evolution. Darwin’s House of Cards is a fully up-to-date survey of the mechanics and effects of evolutionary theory — a theory which Karl Popper concluded was “not a testable scientific theory, but a metaphysical research program” (14).

As to the general optimism which provided the conditions for the enthusiastic acceptance of Darwinism in the middle of the nineteenth century, Bethell writes,

[A]s I hope to show in the following chapters, the science of neo-Darwinism was poor all along, and supported by very few facts. I have become ever more convinced that, although Darwinism has been promoted as science, its unstated role has been to prop up a philosophy – the philosophy of materialism – and atheism along with it. (20)

In the nineteen chapters which follow, the author reports on and dismantles numerous evolutionary claims and “evidences,” showing among other things that common descent, natural selection, and random mutations are either pure fiction, tautological, or terribly over-plugged. He challenges the dogma of the tree of life, noticing along the way biochemist Craig Venter’s denial of it (53-54), and paleontologist Colin Patterson’s frank admission that the nodes in the tree of life diagrams are always empty (55-56). Why? Because there is no real evidence for it.

Speaking of Patterson, who was chief paleontologist at the Natural History Museum in London until his death in 1998, Bethell interviewed him several times, and chapter 12 reviews those conversations. Although Patterson remained a thoroughgoing evolutionist, he came to the opinion that it conveyed no scientific information at all. As Bethell reports it, he said that scientists could do very well without it (149).

In the same chapter we are told about two world-renowned experts in their fields who admit that the funding for their respective fields is minimal compared with digging up fossils. Nevertheless, both said that “you don’t find out much from fossils,” and that they could find out much more by studying living things (146-148).

This book’s short chapters are so well written that the author is able to cover a great deal of territory in a relatively short space. This means that along with the usual problematical areas for evolution — natural selection (chapters 5 & 6), the fossil record (chapter 11), homology (chapter 9), DNA and Epigenetics (chapter 15), etc. — he also tackles less well documented issues like extinction (chapter 7), and convergence (chapter 10). There is also a useful chapter about Richard Lenski’s long-term experiments with E-coli (chapter 16).

As to homology, for example, he notes the propensity of naturalists to invoke design while supposedly trying to explain it away. Homologists, or those who rely on them, often write of the relative similarities in structures from different organisms without being forthright enough to declare that these similar features often are derived from different sets of genes! (109-112).

To take a few more examples, despite the recent demonizing of humanity and our deleterious influence on nature by many progressives on the left, no one knows why extinctions happen (86-92). As for “convergence,” the belief that differing species evolve similar traits due to their experiencing the same kinds of environmental and ecological pressures, evolutionists again beg the question. Evolutionists have tended to substitute their imaginations for proof, and nearly always simplify extremely difficult matters in the process. So on page 119 Stephen Jay Gould is quoted as saying that in certain flying creatures, “highly adaptive forms that are easy to evolve arise again and again.” Bethell responds that if flight is so easy to evolve, “Someone should tell Boeing engineers how that was achieved.”

As we’re on the subject of engineering, chapter 13 is given over to “Intelligent Design and Information Theory.” At the start of the chapter Bethell mentions the work of Michael Behe, William Dembski, and Douglas Axe (155-161). He deftly dispatches theistic evolutionist Kenneth Brown’s attempt to oppose Michael Behe’s “irreducible complexity” findings (155-156), and then states the obvious truth that, contrary to creationism, “Intelligent design theory … does not identify a designer, any more than we can identify the designer of Stonehenge” (157). Why then the resistance to ID? For instance, citing Wikipedia’s slanted presentation:

Numerous attempts have been made to change … derogatory comments, but all such changes are promptly reversed on Wikipedia – sometimes within minutes. (161)

The thought-police are very active. But of course the reason has already been given. The reigning view of the intellectuals is naturalistic atheism. Therefore, the facts will always be made to comport with the theory, however vicious the contortions have to be. Chapter 14 describes the link between “Darwinism and the Philosophy of Naturalism.” This chapter includes a good discussion of free will, or the denial thereof by many of these “Free thinkers,” although the irony of their calling themselves by this term seems to be totally lost on most of them! Bethell’s responses to this are effectively structured around the work of Michael Egnor and Thomas Nagel.

Four chapters about the practical fallout of evolutionary ideas come just before the closing chapter on “The Rise and Fall of Progress.” These chapters are superb summaries of the often troubling tendencies of evolution as ideology. First up (chapter 17) concerns the issue of “Sociobiology.” Instinct is replaced by genes (203, 205-207), which issues in all kinds of ethical outrages such as viewing rape as normal. Next comes “Human Exceptionalism and Its Enemies” (chapter 18): a very pertinent section in which the author states his thesis that “[s]entiment for human exceptionalism is inversely related to Darwinism” (216), and which goes on to deal with whether animals will ever talk (the answer is no), and then discusses the common belief that evolutionists have in extraterrestrials. The chapter on AI is unusual for a book like this, and is all the more valuable for it. To summarize the chapter in one sentence: artificial intelligence will never happen (235).

After going through the book twice one of the most telling impressions left on this reviewer was how much of evolutionary thinking is actually circular reasoning. And of course, in the opinion of many influential evolutionists, there is no reasoning happening, since conscious thought is an illusion (e.g. 170, 208-209). But if evolution is true then something like materialistic naturalism must be true (236-237). The trouble is, as Bethell sees it, not only are the accumulated facts eroding the bulwarks of evolutionists, but the ebbing of the supporting tenets of a belief in Progress will surely make evolutionism look more and more implausible.

This is an excellent addition to the literature against evolution, and is recommended for mature readers of all ages. The trolls will no doubt be out in force to give their one star ratings on Amazon. But perhaps a few of them will read it and think again? This is a five star book.

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There are 13 Comments

josh p's picture

Thanks for the review Paul. The Wikipedia comment is interesting although not surprising. I recently finished, “Signature In the Cell” which makes some really powerful arguments for intelligent design. I think I’ll try this one at some point as well. 

Darrell Post's picture

Last week I was at the Creation Museum in Kentucky, and I heard a lecture by Nathaniel T Jeanson around some of the same ideas in this book. One of the points made was the fact that the field of Genetics did not even exist when Darwin developed his theory. Furthermore, his Origin of Species was based on an animal kingdom that represented only 15% of species now known to exist.

His book is called: Replacing Darwin: The New Origin of Species

 

 

Paul Henebury's picture

Yes, Signature in the Cell is outstanding, as is Meyer's follow-up Darwin's Doubt.  

PH

Dr. Paul Henebury

I am Founder of Telos Ministries, and Senior Pastor at Agape Bible Church in N. Ca.

Paul Henebury's picture

Thanks for the recommendation!

PH

Dr. Paul Henebury

I am Founder of Telos Ministries, and Senior Pastor at Agape Bible Church in N. Ca.

Bert Perry's picture

It's worth noting that Wikipedia does not, per se, have a slanted presentation, but rather what you've got is a quorum of intensely evolutionary-minded contributors "guarding" any significant entry on the topic who will instantly jump on any departure from their orthodoxy.  That does, however, beg the question of why they object to any possible support, no matter how minor, for intelligent design, and the main reason I can come up with is that if the door is opened to any support, evolutionists will need to come up with real defenses of how all this beauty could have arisen out of random chance.

In other words, if you call men like Michael Behe anything but totally heterodox and fail to burn them at the stake, rhetorically speaking, the gig is up for Darwinism.  Remember Philip Johnson's recollection of how a group of mathematicians and statisticians who attempted to calculate the odds of random evolution were treated?  It was as if they'd been doing their research at the Creation Museum.  And just for giggles, that's about how I ended up rejecting Darwinism; it's a pretty simple geometric series where each consecutive probability is less than one, which mathematically tends towards zero.  The numbers get ugly really quickly. 

Aaron Blumer's picture

I suppose I could try letting Google Voice read it... but this a volume I'd love to take in via audiobook. The commute is where I have the most time for reading. I wonder if there's a business opportunity for somebody to make audiobooks out of relatively obscure (as in not NYT Bestsllers) non-fiction books.

TylerR's picture

Some Kindle books allow the Kindle device to read the book to you.

Tyler Robbins is a former Pastor. He lives with his family in Olympia, WA. He blogs as the Eccentric Fundamentalist

Darrell Post's picture

Not to drift too far off topic, but I also visited the Ark Encounter last week and found it to be all that I was hoping for. Huge structure, and crammed with visitors--pretty amazing attendance considering it was a Wednesday in the fall while school was in session. The person I spoke with at the Creation Museum said attendance there has actually increased ever since the Ark opened.

I know there were some skeptics here about the validity of the Ark Encounter, as to attendance and sustainability, but I saw none of that while I was there. Both places were packed, and at times almost uncomfortable for the number of people. The creation museum just opened a new parking area to keep up with the growth. My asking around also revealed that many more unbelievers are attending the Ark--some of whom had never even heard of the creation museum. Thankfully the Ark Encounter also had a very clear gospel presentation as part of the walk-thru.

josh p's picture

Aaron, the book mentioned above, “Signature In  the Cell” is available on audible and is a great book.

Bert Perry's picture

Best estimates around now are about a million people in the first year, according to this.  I found a few other sources that said about the same.  Promotional literature prior to opening was predicting about twice that, and to be fair to the Encounter, it's about twice what I predicted back in July.  

This would indicate you've got around 2-3k coming each weekday, and 2-3x that on weekends, just like you'd see in any other museum.  The new parking lots (which I predicted they'd need if they even came close to numbers) presumably are to deal with weekend peak attendance.  Moreover, the crowded scenes are actually one of the things I warned about.  

Don't get me wrong; I want things like this to succeed, but a businessman's look at the numbers does not inspire confidence.  There is a great deal of good to be had from creation science, and I just don't want it to be messed up with poor planning.

Paul Henebury's picture

I remember you saying that Bert 

Dr. Paul Henebury

I am Founder of Telos Ministries, and Senior Pastor at Agape Bible Church in N. Ca.

Darrell Post's picture

Bert Perry wrote:

Best estimates around now are about a million people in the first year, according to this.  I found a few other sources that said about the same.  Promotional literature prior to opening was predicting about twice that, and to be fair to the Encounter, it's about twice what I predicted back in July.  

This would indicate you've got around 2-3k coming each weekday, and 2-3x that on weekends, just like you'd see in any other museum.  The new parking lots (which I predicted they'd need if they even came close to numbers) presumably are to deal with weekend peak attendance.  Moreover, the crowded scenes are actually one of the things I warned about.  

Don't get me wrong; I want things like this to succeed, but a businessman's look at the numbers does not inspire confidence.  There is a great deal of good to be had from creation science, and I just don't want it to be messed up with poor planning.

Well the good news is the Ark Encounter and Creation Museum were well planned and are top quality places. There were far more than 2-3k on the weekday I was there--I would guess at least 5k--its hard to estimate because people cycle thru constantly. I can also testify that stuff was literally flying off the shelves of the gift $hop.

Another point--the ark does not have a stairstep anywhere--its all ramps and very accessible for wheelchairs.  Very well designed.

Aaron Blumer's picture

josh p wrote:

Aaron, the book mentioned above, “Signature In  the Cell” is available on audible and is a great book.

I'll definitely look for it.

About Kindle, etc., so far, I can't quite accept computer-read vs. human read, though the former does keep improving. Maybe someday.

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