Racism

Racism Is Real. But Is “Systemic Racism”? That Time I Was Published by Newsweek—For Two Hours

"Hypersensitivity about 'systemic racism' has many people, of every race, hesitating about being honest about what they think. But honesty and forthright argument are the only antidotes to the fear many people feel, and the only road ahead to racial justice. I expect ad hominem responses to the essay that follows, or willful misunderstandings of its argument....But only good arguments—not silent cowering—can defeat bad ones.

428 reads

On the Use and Abuse of Critical Race Theory in American Christianity

"...as practiced, it quite often creates a virtual irrebuttable starting presumption that 'existing power structures' can be accurately analyzed primarily (or sometimes exclusively) through the prism of race. The end result, ironically enough, is both reductive and complex." - The Dispatch

172 reads

Why Race Relations Don’t Improve

We might have every reason to expect, given the extraordinary attention directed to this issue, that race relations would be improving in America. But instead, they seem to be getting worse. Why are race relations not improving?

Because Some Ignore Genuine Progress

As recently as World War II, the American military was largely segregated. Most units were White with some reserved for Blacks. Black Americans fought heroically for their country, many laying down their lives in defense of the United States. It seems incredible today that those who served with valor could be denied equal treatment with others who fought for the same cause. This is so clearly wrong, that younger Americans may be surprised to learn that such inequality ever existed. It did then, but no longer. Thankfully, such policies are not allowed in today’s America. Genuine progress has occurred.

It’s no secret that not too many decades ago, Blacks were forced to sit at the back of the bus and denied entrance into many restaurants and other places of business, but no longer, because significant progress has been made.

1443 reads

4 Distinctives of a Christian View of Race

Reposted from The Cripplegate.

As #BlackLivesMatter, White-Fragility, and White-Privilege become flash points in our society, and as entire organizations have grown up around the concept of “racial reconciliation” it is critical to remember that Christians should think differently than the world on the topic of race.

The world is fully embroiled in this issue. The phrase “Black Lives Matter” gets painted on streets, while others explain why they reject the organization. The problematic book “White-Fragility” becomes a best-seller, but there are enough secular take-downs of the book that its effect seems to be sufficiently blunted (although I’m sure evangelicals—often a year-late to cultural parties—will still entertain it for a while).

I don’t know if this is true for all pastors, but I have had more conversations and emails on race than I can recall having on any other contemporary issue. It seems like daily I am asked about my understanding of race and racial reconciliation within the church.

1619 reads

White Fragility and Getting White People to Talk About Racism

"I have had quite a number of people ask my opinion about this book [Robin DiAngelo: White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism] ... I am going to provide a kind of summary of its contents and then, in a second article, discuss whether it is a helpful resource for Christians. I primarily want to consider the 'story' DiAngelo is telling." - Challies

688 reads

Darwin’s racism: How early evolutionary theory fueled discrimination

"Race-based discrimination has multiple sources, many of which preceded Darwin, but evolutionary theory gave 'a powerful push to a scientific version of racism that still impacts us today,' said John West, vice president and a senior fellow at the Discovery Institute." - WORLD

293 reads

Barna: Some three-quarters of pastors say churches should support peaceful protests against racism, police actions

Barna "surveyed 400 pastors on June 4-15 and had a margin of error of +/- 4.9%. Of those surveyed, 76% said they believed churches should support the protests, while 15% disagreed and 8% did not have an opinion. Additionally, 62% reported that their churches had addressed the protests and 94% said they believe the Church has a responsibility to publicly denounce racism." - CPost

227 reads

“...we must examine how anarchy is lying in wait to feed on our constitutional rights, and on our naiveté about our own vulnerability.”

"In an earlier blog I emphasized the importance of moral clarity for an effective protest. The case of George Floyd dripped with moral clarity — so much so that 78% of the country agreed that Derek Chauvin . . . should have been arrested immediately. However, such a national consensus and borderline unity was intolerable for the anarchists.  It was necessary for them to muddy the moral waters to accomplish their objectives. And so they began to divide us." - Carl Ellis

420 reads

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