Sabbath

Baptist dishwasher's $21.5M victory honors Sabbath

"The jury ruled that the Conrad Hotel managed by Park Hotels and Resorts Inc. ... violated the Civil Rights Act of 1964 when it failed to accommodate Jean-Pierre's Sunday worship.... The hotel fired Jean-Pierre in March 2016 [for her refusal to work on Sundays] and plans to appeal the verdict." - BPNews

229 reads

The Sabbath

Many people have deep convictions about the Sabbath Day. The Sabbath Day is the seventh day of the week. In Spanish, Saturday is rightly called “Sabado.”

Some think the Sabbath Day was changed to Sunday—quite a leap, in my view. Others think that the church should meet, and people should not work on Sabbath Day, so they form “Seventh Day” religions. Some Messianic Jews even believe that Christ actually arose on Saturday!

When people have agendas, it is difficult to reasonably address these matters. Emotions fly high. And, even among those who are reasonably objective, there is always room to disagree. Here is my take.

Although God created the world in six days and rested on the seventh, there is no implication in the Bible that the Sabbath Day was observed until the Torah was given. Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, for example, are nowhere said to observe the Sabbath. From creation week until the time of Moses, the Sabbath is nowhere to be found in Scripture.

This suggests that—unlike murder or adultery or bearing false witness—the Sabbath command is not grounded in God’s nature and is not a moral issue. It has always been wrong to murder or commit adultery, even before the Torah was given to Moses.

Nine of the Ten Commandments are repeated in the New Testament. The one that is not repeated is the Sabbath Day command. Either this is merely an omission or an omission that makes a statement.

1213 reads

3 Reasons Sunday Is Not the Sabbath

From Philippe de Champaigne's Moses with the Ten Commandments

Reposted from The Cripplegate.

Here are three reasons why I teach that Christians are not under the Sabbath law of the Old Testament, and that it is unwise to call Sunday “the Christian Sabbath.”

I am a dispensationalist

The Sabbath restrictions are found in the Old Testament and are part of the law given to Israel as they entered the Promised Land. The fourth commandment makes clear that the Sabbath law applies to anyone in Israel, regardless of their own personal convictions about the legitimacy of the Covenant. In other words, in OT Israel, just because a person didn’t believe in Yahweh, didn’t mean that they could break the Sabbath. It was a basic component of Israelite Law given to the members of the Old Covenant for their time in the Promised Land.

1262 reads

Why Save the Lord's Day?

(About this series)

CHAPTER I - WHY SAVE THE LORD’S DAY?

BY REV. DANIEL HOFFMAN MARTIN, D. D., GLENS FALLS, NEW YORK

The only command in the Decalogue which begins with the word “Remember” is the fourth: “Remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy,” as if the Divine writer realized there would be more danger of forgetting this than any of the others, and of yielding to the subtle temptations of caprice and convenience as an excuse for violating it. “Remember” stands like a solitary sentinel in front of this solemn command, yet it has been chafed under, from the ancient Jew who was stoned for gathering sticks on the Sabbath, down to the Sunday saloon-keeper who, in commercializing his fellow-man’s weakness, breaks three laws, that of the Sabbath, the State, and brotherly love.

4133 reads