Pew Research

Pew: How younger U.S. Jews are similar to – and different from – older U.S. Jews

"...young adults tend to be less religious than older adults, at least by conventional measures such as whether they believe in God and how often they attend worship services. Jewish Americans, who make up 2.4% of the U.S. adult population, are an exception: The youngest Jewish adults are just as religious as the oldest on some of these measures" - Pew

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Pew: Religious Americans are less likely to endorse legal marijuana for recreational use

"The vast majority of adults in the United States support allowing marijuana to some extent, according to a recent Pew Research Center survey. But opinions about whether and under what circumstances marijuana should be legal vary by Americans’ religious identity and their levels of religious commitment." - Pew

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Pew: U.S. Jews have widely differing views on Israel

"Caring about Israel is 'essential' to what being Jewish means to 45% of U.S. Jewish adults, and an additional 37% say it is 'important, but not essential,' according to a new Pew Research Center survey . . . . However, the survey found that Jewish Americans – much like the U.S. public overall – also hold widely differing views on Israel and its political leadership." - Pew

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Pew: 10 key findings about Jewish Americans

"Jews in the United States are on the whole less religious than the overall public, at least by standard measures used in surveys. But Jewish Americans participate in a wide range of culturally Jewish activities as well as traditional religious practices." - Pew

Related:

RNS: Five takeaways from Pew's massive study of American Jews

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Pew: Broad agreement in U.S. – even among partisans – on which news outlets are part of the ‘mainstream media’

"Overall, a majority of Americans consider seven of these outlets to be part of the mainstream media. That includes the one national network news outlet included in the analysis (ABC News), all three major cable news outlets asked about (MSNBC, Fox News and CNN) and three legacy print publications: the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and the New York Post." - Pew

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Almost half of teens believe many religions may be true, Pew finds

"Among 13- to 17-year-old teenagers, 45 percent believe many religions may be true, far outpacing the 31 percent who believe only one religion is true, Pew said. A much smaller portion, 15 percent, believe there is little to no truth in any religion, and 8 percent believe no religion is true." - BPNews

285 reads

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