Happiness

The Real Reason Why Scandinavians Are So Happy

"...the research behind the World Happiness Report asks respondents to rate their lives on a scale of one to ten, with ten representing 'the best possible life for you,' and one representing the worst. .... the key, says Savolainen, is their low expectations.  They don’t expect much, so they are highly satisfied, and, thus, very 'happy.'" - Veith

470 reads

From the Archives – Finding Happiness in Difficult Times

We’re a week or so into February, so today’s article has a bit of romance for Valentine’s Day and much application (finding happiness in life) for the other days of the year. I came across this true account from Reader’s Digest:

My cell phone quit as I tried to let my wife know that I was caught in freeway gridlock and would be late for our anniversary dinner. I wrote a message on my laptop asking other motorists to call her, printed it on a portable inkjet and taped it to my rear windshield.

When I finally arrived home, my wife gave me the longest kiss ever. “I really think you love me,” she said. “At least 70 people called and told me so.”

In Genesis 29, Jacob initiates what will be one of the great romances of all time; no cell phone message could compare to it. Although this romance had a happy ending (he did marry his beloved Rachel), Jacob’s life was complex, stressful, and messy. Despite great hardships, his life was rich and filled with happiness. How can this paradox be? The answer is no surprise: God.

Jacob had been scared, lonely, probably overcome with guilt, and walking into the unknown. He had stolen both the family birthright and Isaac’s blessing from his brother Esau; Esau was so angry with Jacob for his low-down scheming that he planned to kill him. To preserve his life, Jacob hurriedly exited Canaan and headed toward relatives in Haran (what we now call Iraq).

1225 reads

What does the Thanksgiving season reveal about the human heart?

"If I foolishly assume that I’m a good person, then I’ll arrogantly assume that I’m a deserving person. I’ll place myself in the center of my world and live with an “I deserve” attitude. Because I live with such a sense of entitlement, I’ll develop an inflated and unrealistic sense of personal need." - Paul David Tripp

542 reads

“Notwithstanding Aristotle’s reflections, it is a common view that the ultimate goal in life is in fact pleasure.”

"In The Doctor and the Soul Frankl described how many of his patients, looking for the meaning of their individual lives would end up in 'ethical nihilism' because they held that the goal of life was pleasure." - Acton

432 reads

What Can Miserable Christians Sing?

"[A] high proportion of the psalter is taken up with lamentation, with feeling sad, unhappy, tormented, and broken. In modern Western culture, these are simply not emotions which have much credibility: sure, people still feel these things, but to admit that they are a normal part of one’s everyday life is tantamount to admitting that one has failed in today’s health, wealth, and happiness society." - Carl Truman

2952 reads

Massive Study Finds Link Between High Screen Time and Unhappiness

"In a new analysis of 1 million U.S. teens, my co-authors and I looked at how teens were spending their free time and which activities correlated with happiness, and which didn’t. . . . In one experiment, people who were randomly assigned to give up Facebook for a week ended that time happier, less lonely and less depressed than those who continued to use Facebook." IntellectualTakeout

1019 reads