Critical Race Theory

Dueling Anti-Racisms: Two Views on Promoting Racial Justice in Twenty-First Century America

"Everyone who opposes racism agrees that people of all races are equal in virtue of their common humanity and deserving of equal respect and dignified treatment. They are also agreed that for much of our history, the dominant white population of the U.S. violated this fundamental truth.... But opponents of racism disagree about how that fact relates to contemporary racial disparities and how best to promote racial justice in the twenty-first century." - Public Discourse

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Are Daniel and Ezra Models of Corporate Repentance for Historic Sins?

Reposted from The Cripplegate.

Over the last few weeks I’ve been preparing a review of Latasha Morrison’s Be the Bridge book and Bible study materials. In so doing, I’ve been reading her recommended resources, and have been struck by how central the following claim is to this genre of “racial reconciliation” material: “members of a group have the responsibility to confess and seek reconciliation on behalf of that group for sins that those members themselves may not have even personally committed.”

I went back and forth on whether I should post this portion of my critique separate from my full review of Be the Bridge, or leave it inside the longer review (which is posted here). I decided to run it separately because while it is only a small component of Be the Bridge, this theme reoccurs in other resources. In other words, I’ve encountered a repeated argument that white people have a responsibility to confess the sin of racism that other white people have committed in the past, to repent for those sins, and then to seek reparations on behalf of those wronged by the sin.

So today I want to address that specific argument. Then, in my review of Be the Bridge, I can refer back to this post here.

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On the Use and Abuse of Critical Race Theory in American Christianity

"...as practiced, it quite often creates a virtual irrebuttable starting presumption that 'existing power structures' can be accurately analyzed primarily (or sometimes exclusively) through the prism of race. The end result, ironically enough, is both reductive and complex." - The Dispatch

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Pushing back against the madness

I’m a bi-vocational pastor who works in the real world. In my own small way, I am fighting against the anti-racism madness sweeping our society. If you are tempted to believe I am one of those, “ain’t got no racism in there here country!” evangelicals who worship President Trump and have the GOP party platform sown into my bible between Malachi and Matthew, I direct you to my comments on racism and Jim Crow, and about the dangers of Christian nationalism.

Corporate and government human resources (“HR”) offices are prime movers behind the new religion of so-called anti-racism or critical race theory (“CRT”). This is a movement that’s captured the hearts and minds of the academy and the social science departments of colleges and universities. It may capture you, too. Here’s how it works:

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Critical theory is not biblical justice, it locates evil in the wrong place: Tim Keller explains

"There have never been stronger calls for justice than those we are hearing today. But seldom do those issuing the calls acknowledge that currently there are competing visions of justice, often at sharp variance, and that none of them have achieved anything like a cultural consensus, not even in a single country like the U.S." - Keller

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The Age of Zealots

I have begun reading a short primer on Crtical Race Theory (“CRT”), written by those who believe it. I won’t provide substantive comment on the merits of the ideology here. But, I do wish to take a step back and make an observation - CRT is a religion.

People are very, very religious. Don’t let secularism fool you. It’s a religion, too. Everybody has a religion. You may have seen statistics that say there is a rise in people who claim no religious affiliation. Those statistics are misleading. Religion is alive and well. It’s just a different kind of religion that’s thriving. The religious economy has changed, but it’s still kicking.

Why do I say CRT is a religion? Why do I say there are lots of religions floating around in the petri dish that is the secular West?

Well, it begins by explaining what religion is. For that, I offer you the words of two sociologists and a well-respected theologian:

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