Who's Your Favorite Reformer? - Reformation Day Poll

Martin Luther
35% (6 votes)
Ulrich Zwingli
18% (3 votes)
John Calvin
12% (2 votes)
Martin Bucer
0% (0 votes)
John Knox
6% (1 vote)
John Wycliffe
6% (1 vote)
Philip Melancthon
0% (0 votes)
John Huss
6% (1 vote)
Michael Sattler
0% (0 votes)
Conrad Grebel
12% (2 votes)
Other
6% (1 vote)
Total votes: 17
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There are 29 Comments

Bob Hayton's picture

In honor of Reformation Day, I am hosting a book giveaway on my blog. I also asked those who entered, to tell me who their favorite Reformer was. That sparked the idea for this poll over here.

It's hard to know which is my favorite, but I give my vote to Zwingli as he's so often overlooked and not remembered. Grebel and Sattler are the only anaBaptists I included, as the list was long enough already.

If you're interested, the book I'm giving away is A Reformation Reader by Denis Janz, compliments of the kind folks at Augsburg Fortress Press. You can click http://www.fundamentallyreformed.com/2010/10/26/reformation-week-book-gi... here for details on the giveaway.

Striving for the unity of the faith, for the glory of God ~ Eph. 4:3, 13; Rom. 15:5-7 I blog at Fundamentally Reformed. Follow me on Twitter.

Charlie's picture

I highly recommend the book http://www.amazon.com/Reformers-Wings-Geiler-Kaysersberg-Theodore/dp/019... ]Reformers in the Wings by David Steinmetz. It offers surveys of 20 lesser known Reformers, including Protestants, Catholics, Anabaptists, and some tough to define people.

One of my favorite proto-reformers is Johann von Staupitz, Luther's father confessor in the Augustinian Order. You can see a strong Augustinian soteriology and a clear statement of imputed righteousness in his work. See some quotes here: http://sacredpage.wordpress.com/2010/07/12/the-gospel-according-to-luthe... The Gospel According to Luther's Mentor

My Blog: http://dearreaderblog.com

Cor meum tibi offero Domine prompte et sincere. ~ John Calvin

Jim's picture

I took European history at the University of Cincinnati ('67-71). As I recollect it was my freshman year.

We had to read http://www.amazon.com/Here-Stand-Hendrickson-Classic-Biographies/dp/1598... ]Here I Stand: A Life of Martin Luther . This is really an amazing book, by the way.

This planted the seed for my conversion.

Later watered by reading http://www.ccel.org/ccel/edwards/sermons.sinners.html Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God (an assigned reading for an American Literature class. I hated reading this and it really made me angry. But it also scared me!

I was saved in the Fall of 1969

------- Back to the poll -----
Luther!

Favorite hymn http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Mighty_Fortress_Is_Our_God ]A Mighty Fortress Is Our God

Bob Hayton's picture

Jim,

There were no "Baptists" yet! Just anaBaptists, and I have two on the list: Michael Sattler and Conrad Grebel. Grebel is known as the "Father of the Anabaptists". And Sattler was involved in the Schleithem Confession and has a famous martyr story surrounding him. (Grebel was a martyr too, I believe).

Great to hear of the work of the Reformers being involved directly in your conversion story, Jim. Thanks for sharing.

Striving for the unity of the faith, for the glory of God ~ Eph. 4:3, 13; Rom. 15:5-7 I blog at Fundamentally Reformed. Follow me on Twitter.

Bob Hayton's picture

Charlie wrote:
I highly recommend the book http://www.amazon.com/Reformers-Wings-Geiler-Kaysersberg-Theodore/dp/019... ]Reformers in the Wings by David Steinmetz. It offers surveys of 20 lesser known Reformers, including Protestants, Catholics, Anabaptists, and some tough to define people.

One of my favorite proto-reformers is Johann von Staupitz, Luther's father confessor in the Augustinian Order. You can see a strong Augustinian soteriology and a clear statement of imputed righteousness in his work. See some quotes here: http://sacredpage.wordpress.com/2010/07/12/the-gospel-according-to-luthe... The Gospel According to Luther's Mentor


Thanks, Charlie. I'll have to check that out.

The book I'm giving away does deal with the viewpoints prior to the Reformation, the Radical Reformation (dealing with the anaBaptists), and the Counter-Reformation too.

Striving for the unity of the faith, for the glory of God ~ Eph. 4:3, 13; Rom. 15:5-7 I blog at Fundamentally Reformed. Follow me on Twitter.

Jim's picture

Bob Hayton wrote:
There were no "Baptists" yet! Just anaBaptists, and I have two on the list: Michael Sattler and Conrad Grebel. Grebel is known as the "Father of the Anabaptists". And Sattler was involved in the Schleithem Confession and has a famous martyr story surrounding him. (Grebel was a martyr too, I believe).

What about http://www.biblepreaching.com/trailofblood.html the Trail of Blood ? http://www.biblepreaching.com/chart.html Chart here

Seriously now ... got it Bob (about the no Baptists)! (And I'm not a Trail of Blood guy!)

Charlie's picture

I recommend subbing out Wyclif and Hus (proto-reformers if that) for William Tyndale and Heinrich Bullinger. I was introduced to Tyndale, quite the biblical exegete, in Luther's English Connection by my professor, James McGoldrick.

My Blog: http://dearreaderblog.com

Cor meum tibi offero Domine prompte et sincere. ~ John Calvin

PastorJohn's picture

I am not sure I have favorite but if so it would be a strong John Huss, and then John Wycliffe

Bob Hayton's picture

Charlie wrote:
I recommend subbing out Wyclif and Hus (proto-reformers if that) for William Tyndale and Heinrich Bullinger. I was introduced to Tyndale, quite the biblical exegete, in Luther's English Connection by my professor, James McGoldrick.

Charlie,

I guess I had never thought of Tyndale as a reformer before, but he sure was. Even Erasmus was sort of like a reformer.

I don't know if I can edit the poll easily, unfortunately Thanks.

Striving for the unity of the faith, for the glory of God ~ Eph. 4:3, 13; Rom. 15:5-7 I blog at Fundamentally Reformed. Follow me on Twitter.

Bob Hayton's picture

Still only 3 votes, though! Add your vote if you lean toward Huss, give him a vote! Smile

Striving for the unity of the faith, for the glory of God ~ Eph. 4:3, 13; Rom. 15:5-7 I blog at Fundamentally Reformed. Follow me on Twitter.

Anne Sokol's picture

i voted Luther but pretty much b/c he's the only one I've actually read original writings of (well, translations). I want to read calvin's institutes one day, so maybe then he'll be my favorite.

PastorJohn's picture

Martin Luther and John Calvin were great reformers if you check history when they started out they were kinda two sided when John Huss was converted he fought until they burned him and you might have to dig a little to find this but the after effect was that Bohemia was an independent nation for almost a hundred years. This is credible history but I will leave the digging to you. John Huss didnt start these 11 wars but it was by his influence

Pastor Harold's picture

The whole story of his life motivates me. I read a lot of bio's, but his is my favorite. I think it is his boldness that I admire most. (not to mention A Mighty Fortress)

PastorJohn's picture

Tyndale was also a great reformer we have got to give God the Glory for all the works they done that we may have free religion and not to mention the English version of the Bible. Also the Tail of Blood give the most accurate line of where we came from in one book. Although we may not agree with everything in it. Most people will not search hundreds of books to compile a conclusion as some have so it is a pretty good out line. At least for those who just look at surface history the author was real close

Aaron Blumer's picture

EditorAdmin

I picked Zwingli because I just think he's a fun character (theologian and military strategist)... and I love his first name. People can't even agree on how to spell it.

... it also helps that he was a whole lot closer to correctly understanding the Lord's Table.

Bob T.'s picture

We celebrate "Reformation day" at our church by having our children dress in Monks robes and go door to door. We print up copies of Martin Luther's 95 thesis on parchment type paper. We then give the kids hammers and nails and have them go nail these copies on neighborhood doors.

This has always brought in calls to the church and caused the church to be noticed by many who had not noticed us before. The kids really enjoy it too. This takes their minds off Halloween.

Also this year, on 9-11 we sent letters out to all our neighbors and city officials stating we would not burn two Korans. But no one offered to give us two cars as we had hoped. They did not even offer to give us one! Isn't that some sort of discrimination? :~

Aaron Blumer's picture

EditorAdmin

Bob Hayton wrote:
Gotta love that picture, Jim! As for the Lord's Supper, I lean toward Calvin's ideas more. I think we have a spiritual presence of Christ with us as we eat and drink His supper.

http://www.fundamentallyreformed.com/2006/08/21/lords-supper-and-spiritu...
Straying from topic a wee bit.... what happens to that "spiritual presence" when we are not eating His supper? What I'm fishing for is, in your view/Calvin's, what is the difference between the Table presence and non-Table one? He is present as well when we gather to worship, and when we dismiss, isn't He?

Bob Hayton's picture

I think since God made us as physical-spiritual beings, the physical elements of the Lord's Supper help us experience His presence in a different way than without the physical eating and drinking. The issue is what Scripture teaches about the presence, not our practical poking at it with questions, though.

God isn't with us in presence in the same sense when we disband and go home as he is corporately when we gather for Lord's Day worship. I believe the celebration of Christ's death for us is made more real through the intentional remembering of his death through the Lord's Supper observance, and that Christ is with us and works in us in some special sense which is for our benefit.

Striving for the unity of the faith, for the glory of God ~ Eph. 4:3, 13; Rom. 15:5-7 I blog at Fundamentally Reformed. Follow me on Twitter.

Aaron Blumer's picture

EditorAdmin

Will have to start a thread about "presence" some time.

Jay's picture

Bob, if you want to tell me who to drop, I can sub in William Tyndale. Might mess up the votes, though...

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells

Bob Hayton's picture

I say just leave it alone, Jay. It's not that big of a deal.... Thanks, though.

Striving for the unity of the faith, for the glory of God ~ Eph. 4:3, 13; Rom. 15:5-7 I blog at Fundamentally Reformed. Follow me on Twitter.

Rob Fall's picture

In this period and location (Continental Europe), the term in use was Anabaptist. It wasn't until a hundred or so years later that "Baptist" came into usage in the British Isles.

Hoping to shed more light than heat..

Mary C's picture

I'm going with the relatively unknown underdog -- Patrick Hamilton. Hamilton was the first martyr of the Scottish Reformation, burned at the stake in front of St. Salvator's Chapel at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland at age 24. While young, he made a tremendous impact for Christ. His Loci Communes Theologici can be read (in English) at http://www.truecovenanter.com/gospel/hamilton_loci_communes.html.