Millennial Evangelicals on Israel: ‘Meh’

"American evangelicals love Israel—if they’re older. But many younger evangelicals simply don’t care, according to a new survey from Nashville-based LifeWay Research." CToday

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Bert Perry's picture

...the discussion we had about whether we ought to be preaching the minor prophets.  Some did, some did not think their congregation was mature enough, and it's simply a fact that it is in the prophets that you'll find God's future promises to Israel.  And while, having been born in 1969, I wasn't around in 1948 to hear what was coming from pulpits, I have to wonder whether evangelical (or "fundagelical") pastors have largely moved away from the preaching of prophecy.  

Another factor, for sure, is the resurgence of Reformed theology, which in many/most forms includes Covenant theology that tends to spiritualize God's promises to Israel.  

Paul Henebury's picture

I agree on both points, although I have little time for ministries which preach nothing but prophecy.  Another reason I think is the "Me" attitude of many young people.  They want to hear about how God affirms them, not how God affirms a people group. 

Dr. Paul Henebury

I am Founder of Telos Ministries, and Senior Pastor at Agape Bible Church in N. Ca.

Darrell Post's picture

"Another factor, for sure, is the resurgence of Reformed theology, which in many/most forms includes Covenant theology that tends to spiritualize God's promises to Israel."

This is probably a large part of it, and the byproduct is moving away from both Israel and prophecy in general, which is a shame. Going through the Book of Revelation has fallen on hard times, where in times past it was overdone. I am working through a series right now on Revelation 1-3, the letters to the seven churches, and am finding the messages Christ has for the churches He addresses contain a tremendous amount a material very applicable to what ails evangelicalism today.

But in most churches, the Letters of Paul get studied, as do the letters of John and Peter. But the letters Christ Himself addressed to seven churches are ignored.

Larry Nelson's picture

Darrell Post wrote:

"Another factor, for sure, is the resurgence of Reformed theology, which in many/most forms includes Covenant theology that tends to spiritualize God's promises to Israel."

This is probably a large part of it, and the byproduct is moving away from both Israel and prophecy in general, which is a shame. Going through the Book of Revelation has fallen on hard times, where in times past it was overdone. I am working through a series right now on Revelation 1-3, the letters to the seven churches, and am finding the messages Christ has for the churches He addresses contain a tremendous amount a material very applicable to what ails evangelicalism today.

But in most churches, the Letters of Paul get studied, as do the letters of John and Peter. But the letters Christ Himself addressed to seven churches are ignored.

My pastor did a wonderful 8-week series (why eight?: the final week was a summary/recap sermon that was heavy on applications for today) this summer on the seven letters in Revelation.  Like you say, the letters are VERY APPLICABLE to the church today......even remarkably so. 

Darrell Post's picture

Larry,

Thanks for your comment, that is encouraging to hear. I am about 13 weeks into the study and just started into the letter to Philadelphia (of course I also taught through chapter one--part of the same context as the 7 letters). I am giving serious consideration toward putting the study into a book I would title, "Is Anyone Listening? A Fresh Look at Christ's Letters to His Churches." The title of course being a play off of the seven-fold plea for all the churches to listen to what the Spirit is saying.

josh p's picture

I am doing a home Bible Study through Revelation right now and am also in the letters to the churches. Hemer’s book has been a huge help. 

One other reason millennials might not be as supportive of Israel is that they are overreacting against the kind of blind support of Israel that characterizes some conservatives. 

TylerR's picture

I believe these are two major factors:

  1. Bad, stupid and incompetent preaching and teaching on prophesy in years past has soured some folks on prophesy in general. I'll always remember one pastor seizing on the mention of an "eagle" from Jeremiah as proof America was prophesied in Scripture.
  2. An upsurge of Reformed theology and (by extension) amillennialism.

If you want to see an example of responsible teaching on prophesy, check out Bauder's discussion on the pre-tribulational rapture.

Tyler Robbins is a former Pastor. He lives with his family in Olympia, WA. He blogs as the Eccentric Fundamentalist