All the Right Beliefs for All the Wrong Reasons

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Mark_Smith's picture

In my office at school I have an article somewhere from the NY Times from 8 years ago, the year I started teaching university full time. The article states the results of a survey that the average American high school only graduate reads NO BOOKS in his life after school. The average college graduate reads 1 book after graduating.

The fact is the average American, even Christians, don't connect with the written word the way we used to. Look at the decline in newspaper readership and the quality of the articles. I think this leads to the rise of Charismatic Christianity, and in the rise of the "worship" movement. People on average no long connect with God through the written and spoken word. They want to feel Him. So, they go for experiences.

In a nut shell, we need to totally transform our thinking if we expect the average believer to want to really be to defend doctrine.

 

TylerR's picture

Editor

A Pastor on my ordination council proudly announced he had never read a single theological book since Bible College in the 1970's.

Tyler is a pastor in Olympia, WA and an Investigations Manager with a Washington State agency. He's the author of the book What's It Mean to Be a Baptist?

Jim's picture

TylerR wrote:

A Pastor on my ordination council proudly announced he had never read a single theological book since Bible College in the 1970's.

Yikes!

Susan R's picture

EditorModerator

When I read articles about writing for internet readers, one of the things most emphasized is making an article "scannable", so people can glance through it to find the information they need.

I admit, I do LOVE the paragraph, and some articles could use some white space. But the idea of encouraging people to glance over a 1200 word article and purposefully take things out of context... it makes my knees itch.