How Piedmont International University became one of the fastest-growing and most forward-looking bible colleges in the country

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Paul J. Scharf's picture

I knew that Piedmont seemed to be doing well, but was not aware of all of these developments.

The article—coming from a secular source—is quite well-written and complimentary.

The president handled the media spotlight very well, also, which was a huge part of that.

It will likely take a similar level of savvy, smarts and forward thinking from any Christian institution that desires to survive the current climate and coming vicissitudes. One key ingredient at Piedmont seems to be a willingness to work with others—even to stretch outside of her institutional comfort zone to take advantage of opportunities.

At times, fundamentalists have been extremely unartful in that regard. I pray that we might all learn from Piedmont.

Church Ministries Representative for the Friends of Israel Gospel Ministry

Jonathan Charles's picture

I graduated from TTU. Other than benefiting from getting the Ph.D. program in leadership:

1. Did they benefit from getting the physical assets of TTU?  My take was that by merging with Piedmont, leadership at TTU could quickly move on and let Piedmont deal with the “stuff.” How has that worked out?

2. How is the seminary Piedmont gained doing?

Jim's picture

Jonathan Charles wrote:
Did they benefit from getting the physical assets of TTU?  My take was that by merging with Piedmont, leadership at TTU could quickly move on and let Piedmont deal with the “stuff.” How has that worked out?

Per Guidestar (most recent reporting and no 990!) there wasn't much left!

Steve Newman's picture

It does seem that their mergers involved them inheriting some of the client base of these schools and pastoral support. Not sure every institution could do that.