"The Bible nowhere directly teaches the age of the earth."

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Jay's picture

I don't know what's going on at the highest levels of TGC, but they certainly are spinning in all kinds of weird directions lately.  The movement to block users from their Twitter feed from questioning their stories or even disagreeing, the refusal to address the ongoing issues with Mark Driscoll while that was ongoing, the emphasis on covenant theology combined with the continued disparagement of dispensationalists, and now a featured story by Justin Taylor (!) on why Genesis 1-2 don't actually mean literal days...I wonder if this is what Harold Lindsell felt like during the Fuller Seminary meltdown.

Something is off there, and it doesn't bode well for them.  I'm not very optimistic for that organization.  Maybe they should rename themselves 'together for the gospel, as we understand it'. 

"Our task today is to tell people — who no longer know what sin is...no longer see themselves as sinners, and no longer have room for these categories — that Christ died for sins of which they do not think they’re guilty." - David Wells

Jim's picture

Contrary to what is often implied or claimed by young-earth creationists, the Bible nowhere directly teaches the age of the earth.

  • This sentence is obviously true: "the Bible nowhere directly teaches the age of the earth"
  • This sentence is foggier: "what is often implied or claimed by young-earth creationists". Response: While A-I-G is definite (link), many Y-E-C would not accept that date. (I personally have never taken the position that the earth is 6000 years old)
AndyE's picture

I was happy to see some decent responses challenging Justin's remarks.  I think there is *some* flexibility on the actual age of the earth, but not on the basis of expanding the length of the days, and certainly not enough to satisfy an evolutionist.

Paul Henebury's picture

Well, one thing we can say for sure.  The Bible definitely does NOT teach the days of Genesis 1 are millions of years!

Dr. Paul Henebury

I am Founder of Telos Ministries, and Senior Pastor at Agape Bible Church in N. Ca.

Andrew K's picture

Jay wrote:

I don't know what's going on at the highest levels of TGC, but they certainly are spinning in all kinds of weird directions lately.  The movement to block users from their Twitter feed from questioning their stories or even disagreeing, the refusal to address the ongoing issues with Mark Driscoll while that was ongoing, the emphasis on covenant theology combined with the continued disparagement of dispensationalists, and now a featured story by Justin Taylor (!) on why Genesis 1-2 don't actually mean literal days...I wonder if this is what Harold Lindsell felt like during the Fuller Seminary meltdown.

Something is off there, and it doesn't bode well for them.  I'm not very optimistic for that organization.  Maybe they should rename themselves 'together for the gospel, as we understand it'. 

I know the Reformation21 crowd has been going after them. (Just one of the most recent satirical examples: http://www.reformation21.org/blog/2015/01/breaking-new-archeological-dis... )

At first, I thought their criticisms were a little unfair. But now I'm beginning to realize that they've been seeing something I haven't seen. Something under the surface that's starting to emerge...

JC's picture

TGC does not need bloggers who simply pose undermining questions.  On that basis, the devil would qualify as a TGC blogger 'Has God really said...?'  It starts with doubting Genesis and Revelation and soon even the gospels are not authoraitve.  It is time for the adults at TGC to step up and affirm Biblical truths.

Unless you think this an overly harsh assessment, note that this is not the first time Justin Taylor has used TGC website to undermine the simple truths taught in God's Word.  Last year he wrote an article questioning the inerrancy of Scripture

Ed Vasicek's picture

Although there are some great Christian minds in TGC-- and I agree with much of what they write and say-- the personality of the movement itself troubles me. What is tragic is that they could present their positions in kindness and graciousness without misrepresenting those who hold other opinions.  Christians ought to be fair, even in their summaries of opposing views.  

This groups (and the Reformed movement in general) doesn't seem to be as troubled as many when it comes to sexual scandals; their besetting sin -- IMO -- seems to be unbridled arrogance and pride. The repeated bouts with leaders noted for unbridled arrogance -- and their outright snobbery and denigration of dispensationalists -- is posturing them for an amazing fall, if Proverbs 16:18 [ESV] has any bearing: "Pride goes before destruction, and a haughty spirit before a fall."

But it is the unbridled snobbery that is evidenced by some and TOLERATED BY ALL that disenchants me most.They don't know who the real enemy is, and seem to be on a path to attack those of us whose theological forefathers preserved the faith of the Bible during some dark times (1900's-1970's).  

When Time Magazine wrote of the born-again movement when Jimmy Carter was running for office, they identified Moody Bible Institute and Dallas Seminary as being at the forefront fo the evangelical movement. The Reformed movement, back then (which was mostly the Reformed and Presbyterian denominations), was generally introverted and cowering in their corner of tradition, reciting creeds and dressing up for church.  Now that the evangelical base has grown, they have taken the innovations of the non-reformed (e.g., contemporary Christian music came primarily from the charismatic movement, adapting to technology, body life, etc.), added reformed theology, and stuck their tongue out at the scholars of Dallas and Moody and now the modern Creationist movement.  

It is a shame such great minds cannot be tempered with humility and kindness -- and a desire to respectfully present their case, without mockery or straw men.

Do not misunderstand me: I am not saying all or most members of the TGC are arrogant -- but I am saying they all TOLERATE and are silent about members who are, especially influential ones.  This is not universal, however, because the Sovereign Grace churches did stand up to this problem.

 

 

 

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