Vocation

All Is Not Lost: 6 Lessons to Learn When Losing Your Job

From The Cripplegate. By Jim Stitzinger.

The COVID-19 pandemic will leave a scar on every person in our society. We cannot expect anyone to be unscathed by something of this magnitude. Some will experience the harsh medical trauma of the virus, others the loneliness of isolation. And with nearly 30 million Americans unemployed now, many scars will come through the loss of work.

There is an acute pain for those who lost their jobs through no fault of their own. Despite heroic leadership and careful planning, it is an the economic reality of this pandemic. Last week this became true for me, when the impact of the Coronavirus took its toll on our workplace.

Because this is my story, it has given me a fresh perspective on what millions of others are going through right now.

It is one thing to be humbled, it is another to be humiliated. Being laid off can be a compound fracture that accomplishes both. It is humbling to leave a workplace you love for the final time, and it can also be humiliating to start over, tell the story a hundred times while pursuing the next vocation.

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Young Americans, Entitlement, and the Christian Vision of Work

"Whether directly connected with our passions or not, God calls us first and foremost to do the next thing well, to his glory, with all of our might. Short of this awareness, we risk 'Christianizing' a sense of entitlement. Instead of asking, 'What is God’s will for my life someday?' we should be asking, 'What does God want me to do next?'" - IFWE

385 reads

Does “real kingdom work” only happen when we volunteer at church or get paid from a nonprofit organization?

"'My dream is to one day ...quit my job and do real kingdom work.' ...But at the same time, I cringe at the false dichotomy I hear in statements like this. As if 'real kingdom work' only takes place when one is volunteering at church or getting a paycheck from a nonprofit organization." - Daniel Darling

750 reads

Five Reasons to Preach a Series on Work

In my five decades of attending Bible-preaching churches I’ve heard precisely one sermon series on work. It was my own, and was pretty weak.

It’s possible that the topic has been receiving systematic attention all over the place all these years, and I’ve just managed to miss nearly all of it. But I think not.

For whatever reason, work is a neglected subject, not only in topical preaching and teaching, but, in my experience, also in the applicational portions of expositional sermons. Often, when the workplace is referenced at all, the focus is solely on “being a witness” or “having a good testimony,” as though work couldn’t possibly have any other important purposes in a believer’s life.

So the topic seems not only to be underrepresented in pulpit work, but also to be poorly understood.

For several reasons, our ministries should include systematic teaching on work. Some of these reasons also point to the bigger picture of why work is important in the lives of Christians.

1. It’s OK to do topical work sometimes.

For the benefit of those who highly value paragraph-by-paragraph expositional preaching (as they should) and are hesitant to include any topical work in the mix, a few observations:

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