Apologetics

An Interview with Dr. John C. Whitcomb

On Saturday, November 21, I attended what is something of a rarity these days—a prophecy conference. Dr. John Whitcomb spoke from the book of Daniel, focusing on the prophetic visions of Nebuchadnezzar and Daniel himself. I was there because I wanted to interview Dr. Whitcomb and the conference location was just a few hours from where I live. So the event itself wasn’t the main draw. Like many these days, my attitude toward a prophecy conference tilted noticeably in the “been there, done that” direction.

But I’m delighted to have been there for the conference and to have the opportunity to commend Dr. Whitcomb’s ministry. Even if you are firmly committed to a non-dispensational approach to Scripture or non-premillennial eschatology, I strongly recommend that you go out of your way to hear Dr. Whitcomb speak from the book of Daniel. If you do, you’ll probably discover for yourself what I did.

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"Wilson isn't one of those evasive Christians who mumble apologetically about how some of the Bible stories are really just 'metaphors.' He is willing to maintain very staunchly that Jesus of Nazareth was the Christ and that his sacrifice redeems..."

Atheist Christopher Hitchens reflects on recent debates. Including one with Douglas Wilson.
HT: 9Marks

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All You Need is Love, but...

Article first appeared on SI November 20, 2006

Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
-Jesus of Nazareth (Matt. 22:37–39, KJV)

All you need is love, all you need is love,
All you need is love, love, love is all you need.
-The Beatles (“All You Need Is Love”) 1

Were John, Paul, George, and Ringo, 1900 years after Jesus of Nazareth, reiterating His message to a new generation? Is this similarity evidence that the same basic message underlies all world religions and worldviews? That after we strip away all the external, all the ceremonial, all the legal, all the theological and metaphysical considerations, every religion pursues the same basic values, usually including “love”?

That all religions are basically the same is an idea held both by the man on the street and in the halls of academia. Consider what Paul Tillich wrote:

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Book Review - Love, the Ultimate Apologetic

About the Author

Art Lindsley is senior fellow at the C. S. Lewis Institute in Springfield, Virginia. He is a conference and retreat speaker, and he has taught extensively at several theological seminaries. He is also ordained in the Evangelical Presbyterian Church. His books include True Truth, C. S. Lewis’s Case for Christ and Classical Apologetics, which Lindsley co-wrote with R. C. Sproul and John Gerstner. He and his wife, Connie, partner in a teaching and discipleship ministry (Oasis) based in the Washington, DC area.

Introduction

Apologetics, from the Greek word απολογία (apologia), means to make a defense. There are countless Christian books on apologetics. Many reside on bookshelves in my home. This book is a little different from the rest. Lindsley takes an approach that I have heard in passing but never really grasped until reading this book. His approach is “the apologetic of love.” The author got the idea for the book when traveling in Eastern Europe and Russia where he was speaking on cults and world religions.

Description

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Book Review: New Dictionary of Christian Apologetics

McGrath, Gavin, Walter Campbell Campbell-Jack and C. Stephen Evans, eds. New Dictionary of Christian Apologetics. Leicester, England: Inter-Varsity Press; Downers Grove, Ill.: InterVarsity Press, 2006. cloth, xx + 779 pages. $45.00
New Dictionary of Christian ApologeticsPurchase: IVP | WTS ($27.45) | CBD ($32.99) | Amazon ($32.85)

ISBNs: 0830824510 / 9780830824519 / 1844740935 / 9781844740932

Subject: Apologetics

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Paul at Athens: Observations for Apologetics

Within the Book of Acts is an anthology of apostolic preaching. Among those sermons is Paul’s address to the pagans and philosophers of Athens, what has been called his Areopagitica. [1] Here Paul proclaimed the gospel, not to parthenon.jpgbiblically informed, monotheistic Jews, but to pagans and philosophers of thoroughly unbiblical presuppositions. Here if anywhere we would expect to find insights on how to do apologetics today among secularists with their various isms or among modern pagans. Should apologetics be presuppositional, classical, evidential, cumulative case? Where is the point of contact between belief and unbelief? How should the argument be structured?

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