Apologetics

Audio Book Review: Nancy Pearcey’s Finding Truth

The rhythm of my life in recent years is such that I have little time for paper and ink reading but lots of time for listening. In 2018, I read about sixty books that way. Though nearly all of them edified me in one way or another, most would fall into the category of relatively frivolous fiction. My thinking was that listening, especially while driving, exercising, or doing chores, wouldn’t permit enough concentration to do any thoughtful non-fiction reading—so why bother?

I was wrong. Though the good is often the enemy of the best, the reverse is often true: passing up on the merely good in hopes of gaining the best often gains neither.

Last summer, a discussion here at SharperIron raised the topic of Nancy Pearcey’s Finding Truth, and we later posted Don Johnson’s Proclaim and Defend review of the book. I felt drawn to the book and decided to give it a whirl in audio. The audiobook amply rewarded the effort—enough to compel me to write my own review.

The Audible version of Finding Truth clocks in at 8:44:19 and is read by Pamela Klein. I normally listen at 1.10x or faster and found that Klein’s pace was about right for me at 1.10x. Klein’s reading is not at all robotic, as is sometimes the case with nonfiction audiobooks. Though Klein seems to lose Pearcy’s flow of thought at times, the reading is clear and alive enough to not be a distraction.

1610 reads

Advice to Christian Apologists: Being Wise as Serpents and Innocent as Doves

Review – Finding Truth: 5 Principles for Unmasking Atheism, Secularism, and Other God Substitutes

Reposted with permission from Proclaim & Defend.

Finding Truth is a relatively recent book (pub. 2015). Others have taken in hand to review it already. For a survey of the main argument of the book, you can see Challies’ review, here. For numerous reviews by readers, see Good Reads, here. In my review, I’d like to focus on ways this book can be useful to train our thinking, correct our own attitudes, and aid in evangelism. No book is without flaws (save the Bible); two stand out to me which I will note in due course.

2495 reads

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