U.S. History

Remembering Bob Dole on the 80th anniversary of Pearl Harbor Day

“His fellow soldiers assumed he wouldn’t survive his wounds—and he nearly didn’t. Eventually, he was sent back to the US in a full body cast and spent thirty-nine months in recovery. He had lost all mobility in his right arm and hand, and getting dressed in the morning would be a challenge for the rest of his life.” - Denison

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400 Years of Gratitude

The Mayflower Compact 1620 - Jean Leon Gerome Ferris

While we are not certain of the exact date, we do know that this year marks the 400th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ first Thanksgiving celebration in Plymouth.1

In the fall of 1621, “the 53 surviving Pilgrims and Chief Massasoit with his 90 Indian braves”2 (of the Wampanoag Tribe) came together to mark the bounty of their harvest and to give praise to God for graciously preserving them and providing for them.

Pilgrim Edward Winslow—signer of the Mayflower Compact, three-time governor of Plymouth, the author of five books, and a most interesting man in his own right—shared the most detailed historical account of that blessed assembly in a work commonly referred to as Mourt’s Relation. In it, he revealed the following details:

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On Nationalisms Through Time

"Goldman’s book is a thoughtful extended essay on the idea of nationalism ... for Goldman, nationalism entails that if the motto e pluribus unum—one out of many—is indeed meaningful, the unum must be some intelligible unifying principle or other.... Goldman proceeds to trace three rival conceptions of American national identity" - John Ehrett

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Conciliation With the Colonies

Edmund Burke, on moving his Resolutions for Conciliation with the Colonies. House of Commons, March 22, 1775

Below are excerpts from the first fifth of the speech. The speech is public domain. All 24,000 words are available at Project Gutenberg.

I hope, Sir, that notwithstanding the austerity of the Chair, your good nature will incline you to some degree of indulgence towards human frailty… . We are at this very instant nearly as free to choose a plan for our American Government as we were on the first day of the session. If, Sir, we incline to the side of conciliation, we are not at all embarrassed (unless we please to make ourselves so) by any incongruous mixture of coercion and restraint. We are therefore called upon, as it were by a superior warning voice, again to attend to America; to attend to the whole of it together; and to review the subject with an unusual degree of care and calmness.

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