Feminism

Why Some Women Still Can't Have It All

In other words, Slaughter’s piece doesn’t simply burst the feminist bubble, it’s an indictment against all of us who misprioritize work over family. It’s an indictment against workaholism. It’s far too easy for many of us to read Slaughter’s piece and feel a bit of satisfaction that even committed feminists cannot escape God’s hard-wiring—God created mothers to mother—while neglecting the fact that God created fathers to father.

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"We have feminism to thank for convincing women to think of themselves first ..."

What feminism hath wrought
“We have feminism to thank for convincing women to think of themselves first and foremost, and that to do otherwise would be to betray womanhood.”
Marcia Segelstein on Venker & Schlafly’s new book, The Flipside of Feminism.

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Mothers Saved in Childbearing? Part 2

Reprinted (with permission) from Faith Pulpit, March/April, 2010. See Part 1.

The Meaning of “She Will Be Saved in Childbearing”

In view of these considerations, what does the phrase “she will be saved in childbearing” mean? Several views have been offered:

(1) Women will be kept safe physically during childbirth.1 However, many godly women have died in childbirth. Moreover, the term “salvation” regularly has a spiritual meaning in Paul’s writings.

(2) Women in Paul’s day would be kept from teaching false doctrine through their maternal roles.”2 Nevertheless, “Paul roots his teaching deeply in the culture-transcending events of the Creation and Fall of man and woman. There is absolutely nothing in the passage which would suggest that Paul issued his instructions because of a local situation of societal pressure.”3

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Mothers Saved in Childbearing? Part 1

Reprinted (with permission) from Faith Pulpit, March/April, 2010.

The topic of a woman’s role in the church has been one of the most heated debates in contemporary Christianity. Moreover, a woman’s role in the home, as a wife and mother, is under attack in our culture. In this article, Mrs. Martha Hartog, adjunct faculty member at Faith Baptist Bible College in Ankeny, Iowa, addresses this issue with a thoughtful examination of the phrase, “she will be saved in childbearing” (1 Tim. 2:15).

In I Timothy 2:8-15 Paul focused on a woman’s role in the church as well as her role as a mother. The passage closes with these words: “Nevertheless she will be saved in childbearing if they continue in faith, love, and holiness, with self-control” (2:15).1 A brief look at its context and some grammatical matters should help us understand the meaning and importance of this verse.

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