Science

Scientists Replay Movie Encoded in DNA

"For the first time, a primitive movie has been encoded in – and then played back from – DNA in living cells. Scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health say it is a major step toward a 'molecular recorder' that may someday make it possible to get read-outs, for example, of the changing internal states of neurons as they develop." NIMH

980 reads

Earth Day 2017 and the Anti-Scientific ‘March for Science’

"[S]ound science is based on evidence and not climate scaremongering. ... doesn’t work by consensus... tests theories and predictions against observations of the real world...doesn’t intimidate dissenters, manipulate data, attack critics, or play lackey to politics."

1264 reads

Religion drives skepticism about evolution, but not climate change

"In a recent edition of the journal Environment and Behavior, Rice University sociologist Elaine Howard Ecklund and her colleagues write that while religious views drive Americans’ rejection of evolution, skepticism about climate change is more a function of political views and lack of confidence in the work of scientists." RNS

1081 reads

Climate Science, Energy Policy, Poverty, and Christian Faith: How do they Connect?

"In the March 16, 2016, issue of Forbes astrophysicist Ethan Siegel’s article The Next Great Global Warming ‘Hiatus’ is Coming! sought to refute sceptics of catastrophic anthropogenic global warming (CAGW) by arguing that the apparent lack of statistically significant global warming over roughly the last 18 or 19 years is just one in a series of lulls in a long-term warming trend for which human action is responsible." CW

774 reads

Review - The Territories of Science & Religion

Image of The Territories of Science and Religion
by Peter Harrison
University of Chicago Press 2015
Hardcover 320

Science Versus Religion: a New Angle

The battle between Science and Religion has been presented to the wider public as a struggle between reason and superstition. In the present intellectual climate, where the ghosts of logical positivism have been far from exorcised from the corridors of scientific thinking, any countering of the reigning attitude is most welcome. The volume under review is an absorbing historical account of the way the words scientia and religio have been used through time, and how they have changed their meanings since about the middle of the 19th century. The book under review is scholarly yet readable, comprising six chapters, an epilogue, fifty plus pages of notes, and indices.

It may seem that a book-length study on two archaic words would scarcely qualify as a riveting read, still less that it would be of any relevance. But Peter Harrison, who is a distinguished historian of science at the University of Queensland in Australia, has managed to produce a study which does both things. The resultant work is a real contribution to the Science versus Religion debate; a debate that has been impacted to a large degree by its wrong understandings of the terminology.

8143 reads

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